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Full text of "Annual report"

THE TOWN of IPSWICH 

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1973 ANNUAL REPORT 



Ipswich 
League Of Women Voters 



YOUR VOTERS SERVICE COMMITTEE 

presents statements of candidates for office requested in 
a questionnaire sent to them. The information is in the 
candidates' own words and is listed in the order in which 
their names will appear on the March 13 ballot. 1 ^ $ 



Questions submitted to candidates were: 

1. Name, address, and age 

2. Education, training and experience that qualify 
you for this office 

3. Duties of this office which interest you most and 
your reasons for seeking this office (limited to 
100 words). 



For another League service 

CALL EL 6-3692 

For transportation to the 

polls March 13th. 



s 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE CANDIDATES 

For Three-Year Term 
(Three Vacancies) 

LEON K. PURINGTON, (incumbent) Lineforook Road. Age 34. 

Education: Rowley Elementary, Ipswich High, Beverly Trade School. 

Served three years on Ipswich School Committee. 

I am interested in being on the School Committee to work to give all the 
children in Ipswich the best education possible, at the smallest cost possible to 
the taxpayers. 

FRANCIS (FRANK) J. AMARO, Essex Road at Lakeman's Lane. Age 34. 

Education: Peabody public schools; B. S., Boston College; M. S., Tufts Uni- 
versity; special studies at Eliot Pearson in related fields of education and ad- 
ministration. Director of Gray Knoll School; salesmanager of an automotive parts 
wholesale firm. Married to the former Hattie E. Safstrom of Ipswich and father 
of four children, three attending various levels of Ipswich schools. 

I wish to serve on the School Committee to represent all the people of Ipswich 
by working to provide a quality education for our children and a balanced 
economic program for our community. 

I know Ipswich can have quality education by maintaining a good adminis- 
trative personnel, attract and keep a good faculty and constantly improve our 
curriculum. To attain these necessary provisions for good education we ob- 
viously must have necessary school housing. 

I promise vigorous study and action on all these issues always keeping in 
mind the economic interest of the people. Quality education does not require 
reckless spending. 

RUSSELL E. DREIKORN, Topsfield Road. Age 44. 

Education: Public Schools of Newark, N. J.; A. B. Drew University, Madison, 
N. J., 1942; Ph. D. Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, 1950; Member Phi Lambda 
Upsilon (honors in Chemistry) and Sigma Xi (honors in Science) ; Substitute 
Instructor in Chemistry at The Morristown School, MorrLstown, N. J., 1942; 
Chemistry Instructor Navy V-12 Unit, Drew University, 1942-1946, and at B.P.I., 
1946-1950. Experienced in Ipswich sohool affairs through three years as Chair- 
man of the Winthrop School Building Committee; duties included working with 
the State School Building Assistance Committee, the Ipswich School Committee 
and other Town Officials. American Chemical Society representative to the 
Ipswich Science Department, Industry-School liaison to provide the means to 
borrow specialized apparatus for classroom instruction, to plan and organize stu- 
dent tours of scientific industries and laboratories, and group discussion with 
science students on opportunities in science. Present position, Lead Scientist, 
Missile Research, Avco Research and Advanced Development, Wilmington, Mass. 

I want to serve as a school committeeman so that I can help to set a school 
policy that will guarantee Ipswich children the maximum in educational oppor- 
tunity, in adequate school housing for every dollar spent. 

EDWARD P. KOZENESKI, Linebrook Road. Age 32. 

Education: Ipswich Public Schools. 

Life long resident of Ipswich. Taxpayer. Member of School Building Needs 
Committee. 

I wish to help the people of Ipswich retain control of the schools their taxes 
pay for. I am against surrendering control of school budget and policy to ad- 
ministrative heads who are here today and gone tomorrow. If elected I will 
endeavor to shape school policy in accordance with the wishes of the tax-pay- 
ing majority. If elected I will use a vigorous and commonsense approach to 
all School Committee problems. 

A sincere and intelligent approach to school budget and administrative prob- 
lems cannot help but result in a sound educational system for the children of 
Ipswich. 



X 



FRANKLIN GOLDTHWAITE SHERRILL, 3 High Street. Age 32. 

Education: B. A., Yale University, 1949; B. D., Episcopal Theological School, 
1953. 

Rector: St. John's Church, Dickinson, N. D., five years. While there was chair- 
man of the building program for new church and parish house. Chairman of the 
Board of Trustees of St. Luke's Tri-State Hospital for three years. Rector: As- 
cension Memorial Church, Ipswich, since June of 1958. Have been actively in- 
terested in the guidance program of the schools, as a chaplain of the Juvenile 
Court, and in the Recreation Department sponsored Teen-Age Club. Married and 
have three children. 

I believe that we must exert every effort to attract and keep the best teach- 
ers with the deepest sense of their vocation. I believe that we must give them 
the best tools. This will cost money. 



I believe that Ipswich citizens are Willing to pay the price if assured it means 
better education for their children. 

I shall exert what influence I have toward building a new school — toward the 
co-operation of as many people of divergent views as necessary to make this 
possible, and for the kind of administration whose primary aim will be educa- 
tion and secondary aim, economy. 

NANCY L. THOMPSON (Mrs. Daniel P.), Argilla Road. Age 26. 

Education: I attended schools in La Mesa, Calif, and Hingham, Mass., gradua- 
ted from Milton Academy, Milton, Mass., and studied at Wellesley College and at 
the Night School of George Washington University in Washington, D. C. 

For the past three years I have regularly attended the meetings of the Board 
of Selectmen. To learn about the problems of the schools of Ipswich, I have, 
during the past year, attended meetings of the School Committee and of the 
School Building Needs Committee. I have found an opportunity, through mem- 
bership in the local and central chapters of the Massachusetts Council for Pub- 
lic Schools, to discuss these problems with some of the people concerned with the 
education of the children of Ipswich and of other Massachusetts towns. Next fall 
two of my three children will be at school in Ipswich. 

I believe that the success of both our children and our town depends upon 
our having an excellent school system, and that the greatest asset which a 
school system can have is the sympathy and support of the people it serves. To 
gain this support, the School Committee and administration must be responsive 
to the needs and interests of individual parents and children and must show a 
genuine concern for the taxpayer. If elected, I will try to consult with as many 
interested citizens as possible so their views may be more closely reflected in 
the policies of their schools. 



SELECTMAN CANDIDATES 

For Three- Year Term 

(Two Vacancies) 

NATHANIEL M. QUINT (incumbent), 24 Kimball Avenue. Age 63. 

Education: Massachusetts College of Pharmacy; extension courses at Boston 
University. 

Served as Selectman in Ipswich and adjacent town for 27 years, of which 
I was chairman of the Board of Selectmen for 22 years. Served as Town Man- 
ager in Ipswich for over one year. 

I am a substantial taxpayer in Ipswich and deeply interested in all phases 
of municipal government, having dedicated over a quarter of a century of my 
life in public office and civic affairs, as well as having served on numerous 
boards and committees pertaining to Town Government, coupled with over 40 
years actively engaged in business. 

With the rapid growth of the Town and its serious problems, my experience 
and interest should be of great importance to you in my seeking re-election as 
your Selectman. 

JOHN W. TRUDEL (incumbent), 6 Meeting House Green. Age 51. 

I was born in Ipswich, March 31, 1909. My wife is the former Ellen Nugent of 
Boston and Lismore, Ireland. We are the parents of eight children. 

My education background as presented to you three years ago has not changed, 
but the wealth of knowledge in town government which I have received in the 
past 3 years, more than qualifies me to serve you again. 

As a member of the board of selectmen for the past three years I always kept 
in mind to use my judgment, in voting, for the safety and welfare of the town 
and all its citizens. 

I have served you all, honestly, without prejudice, sincerely. I stand on my 
record. 

STANLEY E. EUSTACE, 25 High Street. Age 44. 

Education: Ipswich Public Schools. 

Member of Recreation Committee for five years. Former Chairman of old 
Playground Committee for 15 years. Former Deputy Shellfish Commissioner for 
4 years. Present member of Ipswich Housing Authority. Sponsor of Little League. 
Ipswich Call Fireman for 21 years. Member of various civic organizations. 

As a Selectman, I feel that a Board member should be an active member just 
the same as any member of a company's board of directors: always willing to 
cooperate and compromise for the good of Ipswich, but not a complete rubber 
stamp for any particular group or interest. The future will be faced with many 
serious problems calling for action and progress, but these must be tempered 
with economy. 



If I become Selectman, I will always work for the beet interests of our 
entire town just as I have exerted maximum effort for Ipswich youth all these 
past years. 

DANIEL B. LUNT, JR., Labor-in-Vain Road. Age 35. 

Education: Dartmouth College, major in Business Administration. 

Memlber: Zoning Board of Appeals. Trustee: Cable Memorial Hospital. Chair- 
man: Ipswich Republican Town Committee. 

Our most important need is a Master Plan. For too long needs of the Town 
have been met in hit or miss fashion resulting in extremely high taxes. Only 
long range planning can solve tax and community problems. Schools, roads, 
sewerage, water and electricity need special attention even at our present level 
of population and with an expected population increase the next few years these 
problems will become even greater. Countless tax dollars will be wasted if we 
don't carefully anticipate our needs and plan accordingly. 

Economy, efficiency, and planning must become watchwords if we are 
to grow in coming years. 

ELWYN F. MC CARTHY, 27 Masconomet Road. Age 54. 

Education: Graduate of the Bentley School of Accounting and Finance. 

Fifteen years as a Public Accountant. Treasurer and Collector for town of 
Ipswich 1941-1944 and 1950-1951. Interim Town Manager 1950. Interim Execu- 
tive Secretary July-Octaber 1960. 

During the short period that I served as Executive Secretary many times I 
called attention to what I considered a complete lack of planning in many 
departments of the town. Some of these conditions are now in the process of 
being corrected, principally the water and sewer departments. The Budget pres- 
entation has been changed in some respects. 

If elected to the Board of Selectmen, I will continue to analyze and recom- 
mend changes that should give the Town greater efficiency and more value 
for the tax dollar. 

FRANK SLYSZ, Winter Street. Age 45. 

Education: Attended local and Boston schools. 

Lifelong resident of Ipswich. 

For the past ten years this town of ours has been slowly deteriorating to 
something to the liking of Chelsea. Our roads stink, our schools could be better. 
Our town government plods along to the tune of horse and carriage days. 

With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as 
God gives us to see the right, I will strive to make Ipswich a town that we and 
our children will be proud of. 

If I find it necessary to fight all the politicians in this town to accomplish 
this end, I stand ready to do so. 



IPSWICH HOUSING AUTHORITY 

For Five- Year Term 

(One Vacancy) 

DONALD CARTER HAZEN (incumbent), 26 Turkey Shore Road. Age 40. 

Education: Graduate of Ipswich High School, Class of 1938. 

I first served on the Ipswich Housing Authority in 1956-57. I was re-appointed 
to the Housing Authority in 1959 by the Board of Selectmen to fill a vacancy 
caused by a resignation. I was elected to this unexpired term in 1960. This is 
the office for which I seek re-election in 1961. 

As a veteran of World War II, in which I served with the 2nd Marine Divis- 
ion, I have been very interested in and active in all veterans affairs, one of 
which is Veterans Housing which constitutes the majority of the units admin- 
istered by the Ipswich Housing Authority. 

JOHN G. THATCHER, JR, 17 Upper River Road. Age 32. 

Education: Beverly High School, Beverly, Mass. Burdett College, Lynn, Mass., 
with a certificate in accounting and business administration. Northeastern Uni- 
versity Night School, Boston, Mass. 

I am at present employed with the New England Telephone and Telegraph 
Co. as a communications consultant. I have taken an active part in the Greater 
Ipswich Junior Chamber of Commerce and have served on many committees. 
Also, I was elected as chairman of the Board of Directors. I have also been 
connected with the Auxiliary Fire Department for the past four years and have 
been elected captain for the past two years. 

I have lived in Ipswich for the past eight years and have taken an active 
part in civic and town affairs. 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 

MASSACHUSETTS 




1973 ANNUAL REPORT 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Roster of Town Officials and Committees 


2 


Electric Department 


33 


Annual Town Meeting 


4 


Recreation Department 


34 


Board of Selectmen 


18 


Public Library 


35 


Jury Duty 


20 


Housing Authority 


36 


Eligible for Jury Duty 


20 


Essex County Mosquito Control Project 


37 


Town Manager's Report 


21 


Department of Public Works 


38 


Vital Statistics 


22 


Building Inspector 


39 


Youth Commission 


23 


Cemetery Department 


40 


Planning Board 


24 


Conservation Commission 


41 


Zoning Board of Appeals 


24 


Dog Officer 


41 


Town Counsel 


24 


School Committee 


42 


Assessing 


25 


Enrollment Statistics 


42 


Treasurer-Collector 


25 


Superintendent of Schools 


43 


Finance 


26 


High School Principal 


44 


Historical Commission 


26 


Whipple Memorial Jr. High 


45 


Police Department 


27 


Doyon Memorial School 


45 


Civil Defense 


27 


Winthrop and Baptist Schools 


46 


Auxiliary Police 


28 


Burley, Shatswell and Boone Hall Schools 


47 


Fire Department 


29 


Director of Curriculum 


47 


Shellfish-Harbor Department 


30 


Pupil Personnel Services 


48 


Shellfish Advisory Commission 


31 


High School Graduates 


49 


Board of Health 


32 


General Information 


50 


Veteran's Services 


32 


Ipswich at a Glance 


51 




flj| Zi~&r 7Zm&f. &a 





ROSTER OF TOWN OFFICIALS AND COMMITTEES 




ELECTED 




TOWN MODERATOR 


Term Expires 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE 


Term Expires 


Harold E. Shively 


1974 


Paul Gahm, Chairman 


1975 






Marie L. Scudder 


1975 






James Collins 


1975 






Patricia Manning 


1974 


BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




Edwin H. Damon, Jr. 


1974 


Joseph A. Navarro, Chairman 


1975 


Peter R. Greer 


1976 


Charles K. Cobb, Jr. 


1974 


Walter Poiasek 


1976 


Paul J. Gillespie 


1974 


J 




Edward Kozeneski 


1975 


HOUSING AUTHORITY 




John M. Pickard 


1976 


Arthur B. Weagle, Chairman 


1976 






John G. Thatcher, Jr. 


1978 






Glenfred A. Wanzer 


1974 






Stanley E. Eustace 


1975 


CONSTABLE 




Alexander Bernhard (State Member) 


1976 


Bernie Spencer 


1974 


Jane Bokron, Director 





FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Elected At Town Meeting 

Charles C. Dalton, Chairman 

Edward L. Nagus 

Roger A. Burke 
Appointed By Moderator 

Mary P. Conley 

T. Lincoln Morison, Jr. 

Robert E. Waite 
Appointed By Selectmen 

David W. Scudder 

George Tsoutsouras 

Thomas Emery 



TOWN MANAGER 

Leonard J. Silvia 

TOWN TREASURER 

George C. Mourikas 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Robert H. Leet 

TOWN CLERK 

Harold G. Comeau 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Barbara J. Rousseau 

John R. Logan 

John Kobos 

Harold G. Comeau, Clerk 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Varnum S. Pedrick 
William R. Lewis 
John D. Heaphy 

SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 

Arthur Moon 



APPOINTED 




SHELLFISH ADVISORY BOARD 




Charles R. Terrell, Chairman 


1974 


Andrew Gianakakis 


1976 


Edward Paquin 


1975 


Joseph Kmiec 




Joseph Lauderowicz 


1974 


Thomas Dorman 


1975 


Richard Sheppard 


1976 


James Carter 




Philip Kent 


1974 




1975 


TREE WARDEN 


1976 


Armand T. Michaud 




BOARD OF HEALTH 




William C. Wiggle sworth, M.D., 


1976 


Dr. Joseph W. Adamowicz 




Edward B. Marsh, M.D. 




Edwin Bronk, Agent 


1974 


CEMETERY COMMISSION 




Leon B. Turner, Chairman 


1976 


Gordon C. Player 




Nicholas A. Markos 




Walter H. Hulbert, Jr., Supt. 


1974 


TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 




Mark J. Apsey 




Peter Owsiak 


1976 


John T. Beagen 


1975 




1974 


TOWN COUNSEL 



1975 
1976 
1974 



1975 



Chairman 



F. Dale Vincent, Jr. 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Ralph Hebert 

PLANNING BOARD 

Jason A. Sokolov, Chairman 
John P. Prosser 
George A. Nikas 
Curtis R. Tuttle 
George Rene Mathey 



1974 
1974 
1974 
1974 
1974 
1974 
1974 
1974 
1974 

1975 



1975 
1974 
1976 
1974 



1976 
1974 
1975 



1975 
1976 
1974 



1974 



1974 



1978 
1974 
1975 
1977 
1976 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

James Theodosopoulos, Chairman 
Hollie A. Bucklin, Vice Chairman 
Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. 
Harold Perley 
Thaddeus Maciejowski 
Sharon Josephson, Alternate 
William Murphy, Alternate 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Frederic Winthrop, Jr., Chairman 

William C. Hickling 

Costos Tsoutsouris 

Sarah L. Weatherall 

Dr. Robert L. Goodale 

William E. George 

Andrew G. Connor 



ECONOMIC & INDUSTRIAL 
DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 



1977 
1976 
1975 
1978 
1974 
1974 
1974 



1974 
1975 
1976 
1976 
1974 
1975 
1975 



Louis Joslyn 


1976 


Terrance R. McSweeney 


1975 


Peter W. Williamson 


1974 


Thomas B. Emery 


1974 


Dale E. Dudgeon 


1975 


Laurien A. Levesque, Jr. 


1976 


RECREATION & PARKS COMMITTEE 




Charles J. Foley, Chairman 


1974 


Elizabeth J. Geanakakis 


1975 


Eleanor Knowles 


1974 


Frederick J. Jenkins 


1976 


Douglas P. Holland 


1975 


James H. Daly, Director 


1974 


GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 




Irving Small, Chairman 


1974 


Jacob Israelsohn 


1974 


William H. Smith 


1974 


John Eby 


1974 


Gordon Burlingham 


1974 


Peter Zervas 


1974 


Alfred D. Castantini 


1974 


Jessie Girard 


1974 


Maryruth Williamson 


1974 



CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR 

John R. Harrigan 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John F. Conley 
Barbara C. Emberly 
Louise B. Hodgkins 
George R. Mathey 
Lovell Thompson 
John H. Updike 
Alice Keenan 

MOSQUITO CONTROL COMMISSION 

Alice Keenan, Chairman 
Cynthia A. Burns 
Harold Balch 
Herbert Brack 
V. Byron Bennett 
George W. Pacheco 
Lawrence E. Cummings 



1974 



1976 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1976 
1974 
1976 



1974 
1974 
1974 
1974 
1974 
1974 
1974 



MBTA ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

John C. Vincent, Jr., Chairman 1974 

Harold F. Balch 1974 

Bruce R. Ball 1974 

Raymond S. Barrows 1974 

Leland Carter 1974 

Charles K. Cobb, Jr. 1974 

Cornelius Cleary 1974 

James C. McManaway 1974 

Robert K. Weatherall 1974 

Robert B. Waldner 1974 

Mrs. Doris Greenlaw 1974 

Alan Sherr 1974 

ELECTRIC ADVISORY BOARD 

John H. Ward, Chairman 1974 

Carter B. Hart, Sr. 1974 

Alexander A. Sweenie, Jr. 1974 

George H. Bouchard 1974 

Lawrence R. Sweetser 1974 

George E. Taylor 1974 

Thomas A. Ercoline, Jr. 1974 

Alan Whitehead 1974 

John A. Pechilis 1974 

SCHOOL BUILDING NEEDS COMMITTEE 

Joseph McGee 
Patricia Manning 
William M. Craft 
Peter R. Greer 
Thomas B. Emery 
Alfred J. Kotek 
Gordon Player, Jr. 

YOUTH COMMISSION 

Cathleen McGinley, Director 

Brother Robert Russell, Chairman 1976 

David Baldwin 1974 

Deborah Hovey 1975 

Janet Chapman 1975 

Robert Wickstrom 1976 

Thomas Gregory III 1976 

Ann Horsman 1976 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

Ralph M. O'Brien 1974 

WIRING INSPECTOR 

Alfred Tobiasz 1974 

GAS INSPECTOR 

Glenfred A. Wanzer 1974 

PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

A.N.D. Hyde 1974 

ALTERNATE PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

Rene Rathe 1974 

BELL RINGER 

Harold Bowen 1974 

INSECT PEST CONTROL SUPERINTENDENT 

Armand Michaud 1975 



DOG OFFICER 

Irene Finnegan 

HARBOR MASTER 

Pete George 



1974 
1974 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



ESSEX, SS. 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said 

County. 

GREETINGS: 

In the Name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby directed to notify the Inhabitants of the 
Town of Ipswich qualified to vote in town affairs to 
meet at the Ipswich High School in said Ipswich on 
MONDAY, THE FIFTH DAY OF MARCH, 1973 
at 7:30 o'clock in the evening to act on the following 
articles viz: 

Moderator Harry Munro called the meeting to order 
at 7:30 announcing that over 500 people were present, 
and the quorum needed was 353. A final count showed 
1183 voters in attendance. 

The following tellers were appointed by the 
Moderator: Mark Apsey, John Pechilis, Harold Shively, 
William J. Murphy, Joseph H. Landrie, and Joseph 
Hinckley. 

A Salute to the Flag was led by Town Clerk Harold 
G. Comeau. 

The Invocation was given by Father Francis Hogan, 
curate of St. Joseph's Church. 

Town Clerk Comeau read the opening and closing 
paragraphs of the Warrant and the Constable's Return. 

Selectmen chairman Joseph Navarro called Moderator 
Munro to the main floor podium to present him with a 
plaque, a token of appreciation for many years of 
service and contributions to the Town of Ipswich. This 
plaque was presented on behalf of the Selectmen and 
the Town Manager, and Mr. Munro received a standing 
ovation. 




Harry Munro, 1973 Annual Town Meeting Moderator receives a 
gavel plaque from Joseph Navarro, Board of Selectmen 
Chairman, for his many years of service to the Town. 

(Ipswich Today) 



Article 1: To fix the salary and compensation of all 
elected town officers. 

Moved by Mr. Joseph Navarro that the salary and 
compensation of all elected officers be fixed as in the 
1973 budget. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 



Article 2: To choose the following officers, viz: 
Moderator for one (1) year 
One (1) Selectman for three (3) years 
Constable for one (1) year 
Two (2) Members of the School Committee for 

three (3) years 
One (1) Member of the Housing Authority for five 

(5) years 
And to vote "Yes" or "No" to the following 

questions: 

Question No. 1 

"Shall this town approve the Charter Amendments to 
the Town Charter, Chapter 620 of the Acts of 1966, 
proposed by the Annual Town Meeting, March 6, 1972, 
by amending Section 22 of the Charter entitled 'Electric 
Light Department' as follows: by striking out the words 
'to whom the Board of Selectmen shall delegate its 
duties and responsibilities as electric light commissioners' 
and inserting the words 'who shall be responsible to the 
Board of Selectmen as electric light commissioners', this 
amendment, if approved by a majority of the voters, to 
take effect upon certification of the balloting by the 
Town Clerk?" 



Question No. 2 

"Shall this town approve the Charter Amendments to 
the Town Charter, Chapter 620 of the Acts of 1966, 
proposed by the Annual Town Meeting, March 6, 1972, 
by amending Section 21 of the Charter entitled 
'Department of Public Works' as follows: by deleting 
the words 'water commissioners, sewer commissioners' 
from the second sentence of said section and adding the 
following sentence: 'The Board of Selectmen shall 
assume all the powers and duties heretofore delegated to 
the Water Commissioners and Sewer Commissioners,' and 
by striking the word 'he' at the beginning of the third 
sentence of said section and replacing it by the words 
'The Town Manager', this amendment, if approved by a 
majority of the voters, to take effect upon certification 
of the balloting by the Town Clerk?" 



The above article to be voted on one ballot at their 

respective polling places as follows: 

Precinct 1 Ipswich Junior High School, Green Street 

Precinct 2 Winthrop School, Central Street 

Precinct 3 Ipswich High School, High Street 

Precinct 4 Burley School, Mount Pleasant Avenue 

on Monday, March 12, 1973. The polls shall open at 10 

A.M. and close at 8 P.M. 

No action required. 



Article 3: To choose one member of the Finance 
Committee to serve for three (3) years. 

Moved by Mr. William Markos that Edward Nagus be 
nominated to serve on the Finance Committee for three 
years. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 4: To hear and act upon the report of the 
Finance Committee, and raise and appropriate and 
transfer money for the ensuing year, including the 
compensation of elected town officers. 

Moved by Mr. William Markos that the sum of 

$7,762,791.00 be raised and appropriated for the 

purposes hereinafter designated in the Finance 
Committee report: ! 



1. For the Operating Budget $2,688,894.00 


of this: 




$35,000.00 


from Overlay Surplus to the 




Reserve Fund 


271.91 


from Highway Machinery Fund 


30,579.04 


from Sewer Receipts Reserve 


1,590.28 


from County Dog Refund 


3,570.00 


from Water Pollution Control Fund 


67,000.00 


from Surplus Revenue 


734.80 


from Premium on Loans 


50,515.26 


from Highway Ch. 58 


7,000.00 


from Cemetery Perpetual Care 




Reimbursement 


300.00 


from Cemetery Flower Fund Reimbursement 


200.00 


from Trustees of Reservation 


50.00 


from the Ecology Fund 



Available funds are $196,811.29 leaving 
$2,492,082.71 to be raised and assessed. This sum 
provides for an increase of $31,689.00 in the Reserve 
Fund to adjust certain salaries. 

Also for the Operating Budget I move that 
$600,000.00 be appropriated from the Revenue Sharing 
Trust Fund for the following purposes: 

$10,000.00 for Planning Board Expenses 

30,000.00 for Town Manager Salaries 

10,000.00 for Town Manager Expenses 

10,000.00 for Police Department Expenses 

10,000.00 for Police Department Capital 

10,000.00 for Fire Department Expenses 

20,000.00 for Garbage Collection 

40,000.00 for Rubbish Collection 

30,000.00 for Dump Maintenance 

50,000.00 for Highway Department Salaries 

20,000.00 for Highway Department Expenses 

20,000.00 for Equipment Maintenance Expenses 

20,000.00 for Snow & Ice Control Salaries 

20,000.00 for Snow & Ice Control Rentals 

10,000.00 for Snow & Ice Rentals 

20,000.00 for Forestry Salaries 

10,000.00 for Forestry Department Capital Outlay 

30,000.00 for Recreation Department Salaries 

10,000.00 for Recreation Department Expenses 

30,000.00 for Cemetery Department Salaries 

20,000.00 for Workmen's Compensation 

40,000.00 for Package Insurance 

10,000.00 for Fire Building 

60,000.00 for Police Department Salaries 

60,000.00 for Fire Department Salaries 

Total: $600,000.00 



2. For the Library Budget $102,443.00 

of this: 
$ 4,031.25 from Library Aid Reserve 

Leaving: 98,411.75 to be raised and assessed 
Change reflects payroll adjustment of $300.00 



3. For the School Budget 

to be raised and appropriated 

designated: 
Administration 
Instruction 
Other School Services & 

Athletics 
Operation & Maintenance 

of Plant 
Fixed Charges 

Acquisition of Fixed Assets 
Programs with Other Districts 



$4,371,454.00 
as hereinafter 

$ 122,445.00 
3,293,489.00 

488,040.00 

366,380.00 

45,345.00 

51,069.00 

4,686.00 



of this: 
$ 7,500.00 from the Feofees 

6,493.00 from PL 874 
leaving: $4,357,461 to be raised and assessed. 
This reflects a recommended reduction of $84,500.00 in 
the following categories: 

Administration $ 1,000.00 

Instruction 60,000.00 

Other School Services 23,500.00 

Total $84,500.00 



I. OPERATING BUDGET 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



1. MODERATOR 




Salary 


$ 150 


Expenses 


40 


Capital Outlay 


— — 


Total 


190 


2. SELECTMEN 




Salaries & Wages 


9,942 


Expenses 


5,342 


Capital Outlay 


600 


Total 


15,884 


3. FINANCE COMMITTEE 




Salaries & Wages 


150 


Expenses 


2,150 


Capital Outlay 


— — 


Total 


2,300 


4. PLANNING BOARD 




Salaries & Wages 


825 


Expenses 


16,990 


Capital Outlay 


100 


Total 


17,915 


5. ELECTIONS AND REGISTRATION 




Salaries & Wages 


8,700 


Expenses 


4,565 


Capital Outlay 





Total 


13.265 



6. APPEALS BOARD 




19. YOUTH COMMISSION 




Salaries & Wages 


270 


Salaries & Wages 


15,230 


Expenses 


255 


Expenses 


13,660 


Capital Outlay 


125 


Capital Outlay 


— — 


Total 


650 


Total 


28,890 


7. TOWN MANAGER 




TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 


$ 346,660 


Salaries & Wages 


50,786 






Expenses 


23,500 


PUBLIC SAFETY 




Capital Outlay 


3,375 






Total 


77,661 


20. POLICE DEPT. 

Salaries & Wages 




8. ACCOUNTANT 




Chief 




Salaries & Wages 


39,164 


Base 


24,851 


Expenses 


10,702 


Incentive 


2,485 


Capital Outlay 


— — 


Holiday 


956 


Total 


49,866 


Total 
Sergeants (3) 


28,292 


9. TREASURER & COLLECTOR 




Base 


46,098 


Salaries & Wages 


44,910 


Incentive 


1,525 


Expenses 


5,350 


Holiday 


1,813 


Capital Outlay 


1,025 


Total 


49,436 


Total 


51,240 


Patrolmen 


(13) 






Base 


177,190 


10. ASSESSORS 




Incentive 


6,990 


Salaries & Wages 


36,855 


Holiday 


6,631 


Expenses 


4,819 


Total 


190,811 


Capital Outlay 


685 


Patrolmen, New (1) 




Total 


42,359 


Base 


8,252 






Incentive 


— — 


11. TOWN CLERK 




Holiday 


275 


Salaries & Wages 


18,402 


Total 


8,527 


Expenses 


1,485 


Overtime 


17,500 


Capital Outlay 


325 


Shift Differential 


3,034 


Total 


20,212 


Court Fees 


9,000 






Other Salaries 


4,669 


12. LEGAL DEPT. 




Total Salaries 


311,269 


Salaries & Wages 


16,603 






Expenses 


555 


Expenses 


16,460 


Capital Outlay 


— — 


Capital Outlay 


10,310 


Total 


17,158 


Total 


338,039 


13. ENGINEER 




21. FIRE DEPT. 




Salaries & Wages 


-"— — 


Salaries & Wages 




Expenses 


— — 


Chief 




Capital Outlay 
Total 


— — 


Base 

Incentive 


25,671 


14. INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 


150 
1,075 


Holiday 
Total 
Captains (3) 
Base 


988 
26,659 

46,480 


Capital Outlay 


125 


Incentive 




Total 


1,350 


Holiday 


1,788 


15. HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

T» 


450 


Total " 
Firefighters (12) 


48,268 


Expenses 


Base 


167,652 






Incentive 


400 


16. CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Salaries & Wages 


750 

1 1 OA 


Holiday 
Total ' 


6,410 
174,462 


Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 


1,180 
5,000 
6,930 


Firefighters, New (2, July) 
Base 
Incentive 


17,048 


17. HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 


^ a r\ 


Holiday 
Total 


721 
17,769 


Expenses 


340 


Overtime 


8,264 


18. NUCLEAR ADVISORY 

T" I 




Call Lieutenants (3) 
Call Operator (1) 


2,835 
945 


Expenses 




Call Men (26) 


20,475 



Other Salaries 

Total Salaries 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 

Total 

22. CIVIL DEFENSE 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 

Total 

23. SHELLFISH 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 

Total 

24. HARBORS 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Total 

25. BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 



HEALTH & SANITATION 



26. 



TOWN HEALTH AGENT 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

OUTSIDE CONTRACTS 

Garbage Collection 
Rubbish Collection 
Dump Maintenance 
Total 



TOTAL HEALTH & SANITATION 



27. 



VETERANS SERVICES 



28. 



VETERANS BENEFITS 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 



PUBLIC WORKS 



29. 



ADMINISTRATION 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 






30. BUILDING DIVISION 


299,677 


a. Town Hall 


14,470 


Salaries & Wages 


9,700 


Expenses 


323,847 


Capital Outlay 

Total 




1 \J lal 

b. Memorial Building 


2,050 


Salaries & Wages 


1,550 


Expenses 


1.175 


Total 


4,775 


c. Sewer Building 




Expenses 


14,902 


d. Fire Building 


11,200 


Expenses 
Capital Outlay 


26,102 


Total 




e. Town Garage 




Expenses 


3,000 


Capital Outlay 


800 


Total 


3,800 


f. Cemetery Buildings 




Expenses 




Capital Outlay 


10,745 


Total 


1,320 
100 


g. Park Buildings 


Expenses 


12,165 


Rent 


708,728 


Capital Outlay 
Total 




h. Library Building 




Expenses 




Capital Outlay 




Total 


23,162 




16,333 


31. HIGHWAY DIVISION 


— — 


Salaries & Wages 


39,495 


Expenses 




Capital Outlay 


A ^ /"\/\/\ 


Total 


42,000 
80,000 


32. EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE 


54,000 


Salaries & Wages 


176,000 


Expenses 




Capital Outlay 


215,495 


Total 




33. SNOW & ICE CONTROL 




Salaries & Wages 




Expenses 




Outside Rentals 




Total 


216,750 


34. FORESTRY 


216,750 


Salaries & Wages 




Expenses 




Capital Outlay 




Total 




35. SEWER 




Salaries & Wages 




Expenses 


18,771 


Capital Outlay 


3,335 


Total 



22,106 



TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 



10,369 
9,900 
5,000 

25,269 



3,765 
3,765 

760 

4,300 
17,000 
21,300 

3,960 

750 

4,710 

730 

370 

1,100 

1,400 
3,600 

5,000 

3,455 

600 

4,055 



110,160 

124,260 

27,500 

261,920 



26,470 

55,620 

900 

82,990 



28,000 
32,500 
18,000 
78,500 



55,857 
18,435 
18,600 
92,892 



27,790 
15,795 

43,585 

647,952 



RECREATION & PARKS 



III. SCHOOL 



36. 



37. 



RECREATION & PARKS 




Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 


75,121 

18,070 

8,250 

101,441 


CEMETERIES 




CEMETERIES 




Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 


72,380 

11,434 

4,000 

87,814 



INSURANCE 



38. INSURANCE 

Workmen's Compensation 
Package Insurance 
Public Officials Bond 
Fire & Police 
Total 



EMPLOYEE BENEFITS 



39. 



BENEFITS 

Military Service Credits 
County Retirement System 
Health & Life 
Other 
Total 



DEBT SERVICE 



40. 



DEBT SERVICE 

Payment of Interest 
Payment of Principal 
Total 



UNCLASSIFIED 

41. ENCUMBRANCES 

42. RESERVE FUND 

43. BOND ISSUE COSTS 

44. INTEREST ON TAX ANTICIPATION 

Total 

TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 



II. LIBRARY 



45. 



LIBRARY OPERATING 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



38,000 

61,000 

1,400 

3,000 

103,400 



20,000 

242,195 

90,000 

352,195 



102,590 
294,000 
396,590 



35,000 

5,000 

40,000 

80,000 

3,257,025 



76,613 

23,830 

1,700 

102,143 



46. SCHOOL BUDGET* 

Administration 
Instruction 

Other School Services & Athletics 
Oper. & Maint. of Plant 
Fixed Charges 

Acquisition of Fixed Assets 
Programs with Other Districts 
Encumbrances from Other Years 
Total 

SUMMARY OF BUDGETS I, II, & III 

*Does not include Whittier Vocational 
Expenditure made by Article 

The total of all recommended budgets is 
The total available funds are 
The Revenue Sharing Trust Fund 
appropriations are 

The total to be raised and assessed is 



122,445 

3,293,489 

488,040 

366,380 

45,345 

5 1 ,069 

4,686 

4,371,454 

$7,730,622 

$488,972 

$7,762,791.00 
214,835.54 

600,000.00 

$6,947,955.46 



Mr. Markos spoke at length on the budget, referring 
particularly to the proposed cut to the school budget. 
He explained that the majority of the Finance 
Committee thought the school budget excessive. Mr. 
Charles Passales recommended that the budget be 
voted on as one motion, and Mr. Markos replied that 
it was one motion. Mr. George Geanakis was assured 
by Town Counsel Vincent that the cut was legal, that 
the Finance Committee was under no obligation to 
agree with the School Committee, and that the School 
Committee or ten taxpayers' petition could get a court 
order to borrow the money on the town's credit to 
be paid back with an added 25 percent. 

Mrs. M. L. Scudder, Chairman of the Ipswich 
School Committee, then moved that the previous 
motion be amended to read that the sum of 
$4,439,954.00 be appropriated to provide an amount 
of money sufficient for the support of the Public 
Schools as required by Chapter 71, Section 34 of the 
General Laws. Seconded. Mrs. Scudder continued to 
explain that the School Committee had already cut 
the school budget, leaving what they thought to be a 
sensible budget. Superintendent of Schools John Stella, 
Principals Joseph Rogers and William Waitt all spoke 
against the cut, explaining that all possible reductions 
had already been made. 

Charles Passales moved the question. Seconded. 
Majority voice vote. The amendment presented by Mrs. 
Scudder required a hand count and was defeated with 
419 voting in the affirmative, 539 opposed. A 
two-thirds vote or 638 was needed to carry the 
motion. 

The main motion carried with 777 voting in the 
affirmative, 83 opposed. 

Article 5: To see if the Town will vote to 
authorize the Treasurer with the approval of the 
Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue for the financial years 



8 



beginning January 1, 1973 and January 1, 1974 in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 
44, Section 4, and to renew any note or notes as may 
be given for a period of less than one year, in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 
44, Section 17. 

Moved by Mr. Navarro that the Town authorize the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to 
borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue for the financial year beginning January 1, 
1973, to June 30, 1974, in accordance with the 
provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and 
to renew any note or notes as may be given for a 
period of less than one year, in accordance with the 
provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 
Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. Motion carried. 
Finance Committee recommended. 



Article 6: To see if the Town will raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the current expense of 
the Water Department, the same to be paid from 
revenues by the Water Department during the year 
1973, and to see what action the Town will take in 
regard to surplus funds. 

Moved by Mr. Charles Cobb that the Town raise and 
appropriate a sum of $303,661.05 for the current 
expenses of the Water Department; the same to be paid 
from revenues by the Water Department during the 
fiscal year January 1, 1973 to June 30, 1974, and 
further that the sum of $2,088.95 be transferred from 
the Water Surplus. Seconded. Motion carried by 
unanimous voice vote. Finance Committee 
recommended. 



Moved by Mr. Paul Gillespie that the sum of $8,501.30 

be appropriated to pay unpaid bills incurred in previous 

years and remaining unpaid, as follows: 

Health 

Glenfred Wanzer $ 125.00 

Town Clerk 

North Shore Weeklies 32.00 

School 

Mrs. Marcia Fowler 41.09 

Maynard Haley 24.00 

Combustion Service Co. 42.00 

DeChamps Printing Co. 492.00 

Harcourt, Brace World 90.00 

C. J. Lord 30.00 

Building Inspector 

Building Code Administration 

International 15.25 

Fire 

William Patterson 3.20 

Town Garage 

Electric Dept. 40.92 

Haverhill Gas Co. 123.85 

Water 

Town of Ipswich 5,090.31 

New England Telephone 88.00 

James P. McCormack 11.00 

Alco Engineering 155.30 

Colcord & Sons, Inc. 1,358.30 

CalgonCorp. 71.21 

Fischer & Porter Co. 1 18.60 

Civil Defense 

New England Telephone 127.97 

Health 

Carleton Ambulance Service, Inc. 421.30 

$8,501.30 



Article 7: To see if the Town will raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of 
promotion of the Town of Ipswich, an equal sum to be 
made available for said purpose from the Chamber of 
Commerce. 

Moved by Mrs. Betty Cole that $700.00 be 
appropriated to be used in conjunction with a matching 
sum of the Chamber of Commerce of Ipswich for the 
purpose of the promotion of the Town of Ipswich. 
Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote. 



Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. 
Unanimous voice vote. 



Article 10: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for construction of roads 
under Chapter 90 of the General Laws. 

Moved by Mr. Ed Kozeneski that the sum of 
$39,000.00 be raised and appropriated for the 
construction of roads under Chapter 90 of the General 
Laws. Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. 
Unanimous voice vote. 



Article 8: To see what action the Town will take to 
the transfer of any surplus funds in the Electric Light 
Department. 

Moved by Mr. Ed Kozeneski that the sum of 
$40,000.00 be transferred from the surplus fund in the 
Electric Operations Account to the Surplus Revenue 
Account of the General Fund of the Town of Ipswich to 
be used in reducing the tax rate, and the remaining sum 
of $826.13 to be transferred to the Electric Construction 
Account. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. Finance 
Committee recommended. 



Article 9: To see what sum the Town will raise and 
appropriate to pay unpaid bills incurred in previous years 
and remaining unpaid. 



Article 11: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the Maintenance of roads 
under Chapter 90 of the General Laws. 

Moved by Mrs. Cole that the sum of $4,500.00 be 
raised and appropriated for the maintenance of roads 
under Chapter 90 of the General Laws. Seconded. 
Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 12: To see if the Town will raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to cover the Town's Share of 
the annual planning, operating, and debt service expenses 
of the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High 
School District. 

Moved by Mr. Robert Weatherall that the Town raise 
and appropriate the sum of $488,972.00 to pay the 



Town's apportioned share of the planning, operating, and 
debt service expenses of the Whittier Regional Technical 
High School District for the fiscal year 1973-74. 
Seconded. Mr. Charles Dalton stated that the Finance 
Committee unanimously recommended passage of this 
article. The Board of Selectmen recommended this article. 
The motion carried with 939 voting in the affirmative, 1 
in opposition. 

Article 13: To see if the Town will raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to compensate landowners 
for proposed taking under eminent domain and Chapter 
79 of the General Laws necessary for the widening and 
relocation of Linebrook Road and to determine whether 
such appropriations shall be raised by borrowing or 
otherwise or to take any other actions with respect 
thereto. 

Moved by Mr. Joseph Navarro that Article 13 be 
indefinitely postponed. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 13A: To see what action the Town will take in 
regards to Loans Authorized and remaining unissued. 

Moved by Mrs. Cole to rescind the authorization of the 
following authorized, but unissued debt relating to 
projects already completed: 

1. Linebrook School Addition — Article 6 STM 
1-16-67, $100,000.00 

2. Jr. High School Repairs - Article 39 ATM 3-6-67, 
$500.00 

3. Fire Ladder Truck - Article 1 STM 3-6-72, 
$60,000.00 

Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote. 

(At this point in the meeting, a group of unregistered 
guests, mostly students, were given permission to enter 
and observe the meeting.) 

Article 14: To see whether the town will vote to 
amend the vote under Article 16 of the warrant for the 
1971 Annual Town Meeting relating to the construction 
of sewers, sewage system and sewage treatment and 
disposal facilities, by eliminating the provision making 
borrowing contingent upon receipt of state and federal 
aid, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Moved by Town Manager Richard Conti that the town 
vote by printed ballot on Monday, March 12, 1973, at 
the various precinct polling places, the polls being open 
from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., on the following question: 

Shall the town vote to amend the vote passed under 
Article 16 of the warrant for the 1971 Annual Town 
Meeting to read as follows: 

"Voted: that the town raise and appropriate the sum 
of $3,600,000.00 for the construction of sewers, sewerage 
system and sewage treatment and disposal facilities; that 
to meet this appropriation, the sum of $100,000.00 be 
transferred from Sewer Receipts Reserve, and the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen be 
authorized to issue $3,500,000.00 bonds or notes of the 
Town under Chapter 44, Section 8 (15) of the General 
Laws, as amended; and the Town Manager with the 
approval of the Selectmen and/or Sewer Commissioners 
be authorized to carry out said project and to contract 



for and expend State and Federal construction grants for 
the project provided that the Selectmen determine that at 
least 70 percent of the eligible cost of the project is 
available from such grant, and provided that the total 
authorized borrowing shall be reduced by the amount of 
any such State or Federal construction aid, and further, 
that the bond authorization voted under Article 16, 
Annual Town Meeting, March, 1971, is hereby rescinded." 
Seconded. 

Mr. Charles Passales questioned the use of the words 
"rescinding" and "amending" but was assured by Mr. 
Conti and Town Counsel Vincent that the motion was 
correct as read. At the suggestion of Mr. John Bialek, Mr. 
Conti added the words "and/or Sewer Commissioners" 
after the words "approval of the Selectmen". Finance 
Committee recommended. Motion carried by unanimous 
voice vote. 

Article 15: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
a sum from the Stabilization Fund. 

Moved by Mr. William Markos that this article be 
indefinitely postponed. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 16: To see what action the Town will take to 
adopt revised general By-Laws for the Town of Ipswich as 
printed and on file at the Town Clerk's Office. 

Moved by Mr. Charles Cobb that the Town adopt the 
proposed revised general by-laws of the Town of Ipswich, 
as recommended by the Government Study Committee, as 
printed and on file at the Town Clerk's office from 
February 7, 1973, and as published in the Ipswich 
Chronicle on February 15, 1973, with the following 
amendments: 

1. In Chapter II, Section 1, paragraph (b), delete the 
word "fourteen" as it appears in the second line thereof 
and substitute the word "forty-five". 

2. In Chapter II, Section 3, delete paragraph (b); and 
delete "(a)" as it appears at the beginning of paragraph 
(a)- 



3. In Chapter II, Section 6: 

Delete the phrase "one percent of the total assessed 
valuation of real and personal property within the Town" 
as it appears beginning in the third line thereof, and 
substitute the phrase "five hundred thousand dollars 
($500,000)"; delete the phrase "one tenth of one percent 
of the total assessed valuation of real and personal 
property within the Town" as it appears beginning in the 
sixth line thereof, and substitute the phrase "one hundred 
thousand dollars ($100,000)". 

4. In Chapter XIV, Section 2: 

Delete paragraph (b); delete paragraph (c) and 
substitute the following: "(b) Every keeper of a shop and 
every dealer licensed under this section shall keep 
adequate records of the source of merchandise purchased 
for the business."; change the designation of paragraph 
(d) to "(c)"; change the semicolon in the third line 
thereof to a period and delete the rest of the paragraph; 
change the designation of paragraph (e) to "(d)". 

And I further move that the said proposed general 
by-laws shall be in lieu of the following by-laws 



10 



heretofore in force, which are hereby repealed: The 1937 
By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich, As Amended, as last 
published in 1963, Chapters I-XVIII and "Additional 
By-Laws" as they appear in pages 5-32 of the 1963 
edition, together with all additions and amendments 
thereto adopted by annual and special town meetings in 
1964, 1965, and 1966. Seconded. 

Amendment: Moved by Mr. William Markos that 
Chapter XIII of the proposed by-laws entitled "Use of 
Town Property" be amended by deleting Section 1-F, 
"Domesticated animals shall not be allowed to roam 
unrestrained in any of the parkland of the Town." Mr. 
Markos stated that this section was unnecessary since the 
leash law proposal was to be brought up later in the 
meeting. Seconded. The amendment carried by a 
unanimous voice vote. 

Finance Committee recommended and Board of Select- 
men recommended. The main motion, Article 16, was 
carried by unanimous voice vote. 

Article 17: To see if the Town will appropriate a sum 
of money for the purpose of constructing an extension of 
the Sanitary Sewer System along County Road from its 
present terminus to Southern Heights and Southern 
Manor owned by Ipswich Housing Authority, and to 
provide funds therefore by borrowing or otherwise and to 
take appropriate action relative thereto including 
acceptance of funds from said Housing Authority towards 
accomplishment of this extension. 

Moved by Mr. Glen Wanzer that the Town appropriate 
$210,000.00 for the construction of sewers as an 
extension to the sanitary sewer system from its present 
terminus, vicinity of Town Hall, South Main Street, to 
County Road and along County Road to Southern 
Heights and Southern Manor as indicated by sewer master 
plan which has been on file in the Town Hall and which 
is displayed at this Meeting and including acquisition of 
necessary easements and to raise this appropriation the 
sum of $5,000 be so transferred from the sewer receipts 
reserve fund, and that the sum of $45,000 be accepted by 
the Town for this purpose from the Ipswich Housing 
Authority and that the Treasurer, with the approval of 
the Selectmen, be authorized to issue $160,000.00 of 
bonds or notes of the Town under the General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 8, as amended. The Town Manager 
with the approval of the Selectmen is authorized to 
contract for and accept any Federal or state aid for this 
project provided that the total authorized borrowing shall 
be reduced by the amount of said aid. Seconded. The 
motion carried with 810 voting in the affirmative, 3 
opposed. (Finance Comm. and Selectmen approved.) 

Article 18: To see if the Town will appropriate a sum 
of money to construct additions and improvements, or 
alterations to the sanitary sewer system and authorize the 
Town Manager to apply and negotiate for such Federal 
and-or State aid as may be available, and to take any 
other action as shall be in the interest of the Town in 
improving and-or adding to the sanitary sewer system, and 
to see what method the Town will adopt to raise and 
appropriate such sum by borrowing or otherwise, or to 
take any action with respect thereto. 

Moved by Mr. Charles Cobb that the Town appropriate 
$15,000 for the construction of sewer extensions in the 
central core area and Topsfield Road area, substantially in 



accordance with a plan on file in the office of the Town 
Clerk and that to raise this appropriation the sum of 
$15,000 be so transferred from the sewer receipts reserve 
fund. Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. 
Selectmen recommended. Motion carried by unanimous 
voice vote. 

Article 19: To see if the Town will authorize 
improvements in the central water system, being the area 
served by the Town Water Tank, located on Town Hill, 
and do all work deemed advisable in connection therewith 
for the improvement of its water supply, consisting of 
cement-lining water mains and replacing pumps at the 
Oakhurst and Cedarview Pumping Stations and to 
determine whether such appropriation shall be raised by 
borrowing or otherwise, or to take any other actions with 
respect thereto. 

Moved by Mr. Paul Gillespie that $225,000.00 be 
appropriated for lining water mains with linings of not 
less than one sixteenth of an inch and for pumping 
station equipment for the Oakhurst and Cedarview 
Pumping Stations, and that to raise this appropriation the 
treasurer with the approval of the selectmen is authorized 
to borrow $225,000 under General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 8 (5) as amended. Seconded. Finance Committee 
and Selectmen recommended. 

Mr. Gillespie explained that there is inner corrosion in 
the present 50-year-old water mains which affect the 
water flow and results in bad drinking water (a sample 
was shown) and poor fire fighting. It is proposed that the 
pipes be cleaned and cement lined which would be less 
costly than replacing the pipes by about one third. Mr. 
Conti showed a cross section of the present pipe and 
stated that the relining process would last almost 
indefinitely. Mr. John Bialek said he felt the town should 
go along with new pipes. Mr. Jack Pickard asked why the 
town didn't buy their own equipment and reline the 
pipes. Mr. Conti explained that the town did not have the 
men to do the job, and the machine would have to be 
disposed of after the job was completed. Mr. John 
Harrigan spoke in favor of the motion. 

The Moderator stated that a two-thirds vote was 
necessary. The motion carried with 801 voting in the 
affirmative, 41 opposed. 



Article 20: To see if the town will accept Chapter 344 
of the Acts of 1970 - An Act establishing a revolving 
fund in certain cities and towns for the payment of police 
officers for off-duty work details. 

Moved by Mr. Navarro that the Town vote to accept 
Chapter 344 of the Acts of 1970 - An Act establishing a 
revolving fund in certain cities and towns for the payment 
of police officers for off duty work details. Seconded. 
Recommended by Finance Committee and Selectmen. 
Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

Article 21: To hear and act upon the reports of 
committees, and to continue such committees as the 
Town may vote to continue. 

Moved by Mr. John F. Conley that the report of the 
Historic District Study Committee be accepted and the 
committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 



11 



Moved by Mr. Irving G. Small that the report of the 
Government Study Committee be accepted and the 
committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Moved by Mr. Harold Nelson that the report of the 
School Building Needs Committee be accepted and the 
committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Moved by Mr. John C. Vincent, Jr., that the report of 
the MBTA Study Committee be accepted and the 
committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 



Article 22: To see whether the town will vote to 
amend the Town By-Laws by striking the name of the 
provisions pertaining to the operation of motor boats 
"Rules and Regulations Pertaining to the Operation of 
Motor Boats" and replacing this name with "Ipswich 
Waters By-Law" and by inserting the following section as 
section 5: 

a. No master, or person acting as master, owner, 
custodian or other person shall moor any boat within the 
limits of Ipswich waters, that is within the geographical 
limits of the town waters, without first obtaining from 
the harbor master a permit to moor said boat. Mooring as 
used in this section means the permanent mooring of a 
boat to be left unattended as distinguished from 
temporary attended anchoring. 

b. An applicant requesting a mooring permit shall file 
an application therefor with the harbor master. Said 
application shall contain such information as the harbor 
master may determine to be necessary to pass upon 
adequacy of the mooring and gear to be used by the 
applicant. Upon the recepit of the application and any 
inspection of said mooring and gear the harbor master 
may require, the harbor master shall issue to the applicant 
a mooring permit designating the mooring location if in 
the opinion of the harbor master said mooring and gear 
to be used is sufficient to moor the boat described in the 
application and there is available space within Ipswich 
waters to moor said boat without endangering other 
boats. The holder of a mooring permit shall cause his 
mooring identification number to be painted or attached 
to the float of his mooring. 

c. The harbor master shall collect from the applicant a 
mooring permit fee of fifty (50) cents per foot measured 
from the stem in a straight line aft to the stern of the 
boat to be moored. Booms, boomkins or pulpits are 
exempt from this measurement. Said fee shall be collected 
before a mooring permit is issued and the harbor master 
shall pay all fees collected to the town. All mooring 
permits shall expire on March 1 following the year of 
issue. No mooring permit shall be transferable and no 
person shall cause any boat to be attached to any 
mooring unless said boat is described in the application, 
provided however, the harbor master may permit the 
temporary use of a mooring by another boat upon 
application by the holder of the permit. Said temporary 
use shall be limited to a period of fifteen (15) days unless 
further extended by the harbor master. 

d. All spars, cans, balls, or styrene or equivalent 
floatation mooring buoys shall be visible above water at 
any tide level. 

e. The harbor master shall keep a detailed description 
of all moorings, their location and the owner's name, 
telephone number, home and business address, date 
mooring was set and name, length and type of boat to be 
attached thereto. 



f. The harbor master may revoke any permit for a 
mooring not maintained to conform to the description of 
said mooring in the application or for other cause shown. 

And to further amend said provisions of the By-Law as 

presently constituted by redesignating previous section 5 

as 6 and substituting the words and figures "fifty 

($50.00) dollars" for the words and figures "twenty 

($20.00) dollars". 

Moved by Mr. Paul Gillespie that the following by-law 
be adopted: 

a. No master, or person acting as master, owner, 
custodian or other person shall moor any boat within the 
limits of Ipswich waters, that is within the geographical 
limits of the town waters, without first obtaining from 
the harbor master a permit to moor said boat. Mooring as 
used in this section means the permanent mooring of a 
boat to be left unattended as distinguished from 
temporary attended anchoring. 

b. An applicant requesting a mooring permit shall file 
an application therefor with the harbor master. Said 
application shall contain such information as the harbor 
master may determine to be necessary to pass upon 
adequacy of the mooring and gear to be used by the 
applicant. Upon the receipt of the application and any 
inspection of said mooring and gear the harbor master 
may require, the harbor master shall issue to the applicant 
a mooring permit designating the mooring location if in 
the opinion of the harbor master said mooring and gear 
to be used is sufficient to moor the boat described in the 
application and there is available space within Ipswich 
waters to moor said boat without endangering other 
boats. The holder of a mooring permit shall cause his 
mooring identification number to be painted or attached 
to the float of his mooring. 

c. The harbor master shall collect from the applicant a 
mooring permit fee of fifty (50) cents per foot measured 
from the stem in a straight line aft to the stern of the 
boat to be moored. Booms, boomkins, or pulpits are 
exempt from this measurement. Said fee shall be collected 
before a mooring permit is issued and the harbor master 
shall pay all fees collected to the town. All mooring 
permits shall expire on March 1 following the year of 
issue. No mooring permit shall be transferable and no 
person shall cause any boat to be attached to any 
mooring unless said boat is described in the application, 
provided, however, the harbor master may permit the 
temporary use of a mooring by another boat upon 
application by the holder of the permit. Said temporary 
use shall be limited to a period of fifteen (15) days unless 
further extended by the harbor master. 

d. All spars, cans, balls, or styrene or equivalent 
floatation mooring buoys shall be visible above water at 
any tide level. 

e. The harbor master shall keep a detailed description 
of all moorings, their location and the owner's name, 
telephone number, home and business address, date 
mooring was set and name, length and type of boat to be 
attached thereto. 

f. The harbor master may revoke any permit for a 
mooring not maintained to conform to the description of 
said mooring in the application or for other cause shown. 

This by-law to be added as Section 10 of Chapter XV 
of the General By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich, as 
adopted by vote of the Town Meeting on March 5, 1973, 
if and when the same are approved by the Attorney 
General. Seconded. 



12 



Mr. Robert Todd suggested the following amendment: 

That all monies collected as a result of mooring permit 
fees be utilized exclusively for administration and 
maintenance of mooring areas and docking areas and 
navigable waterways. (This to be added to subsection c.) 
Mr. Charles Passales objected noting that the general laws 
would not allow that, and Town Accountant Robert Leet 
agreed. Mr. Markos stated that the Finance Committee 
did not agree at all with the amendment. Mr. Todd 
withdrew the amendment. 

Referring to the proposed by-law, Mr. Ernest 
Brocklebank asked what method of appeal would be 
available. Mr. Gillespie answered that if licensing authority 
refused to grant a license, then person applying can 
appeal to court of equity. Finance Committee 
recommended. 

Mr. Ray Sullivan then moved for indefinite 
postponement. Seconded. Mr. Sullivan added that he 
thought the only reason for this by-law was to raise 
money for the town. Mr. George Pacheco disagreed; and 
Mr. Gillespie, speaking against indefinite postponement, 
said the intent was to relieve conjestion on the Ipswich 
River. Messrs. Ed Damon and Bob Ricker spoke in 
support of the motion for indefinite postponement. The 
motion for indefinite postponement carried with 518 
voting in the affirmative, 254 opposed. 

At 11:02 p.m. Mr. Navarro moved to adjourn the 
Annual Town Meeting until the following night,March 6, 
1973, at 7:30 at the Ipswich High School. Seconded. 
Unanimous voice vote. Meeting adjourned. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 6, 1973 

At 7:30, with a quorum present, Moderator Harry 
Munro called the adjourned meeting to order. The final 
count showed 979 in attendance. 

Mrs. Alice Keenan, not present for Article 21, read the 
report of the Ipswich Mosquito Control Committee and 
moved that the report be accepted and the committee 
continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 23: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
a sum of money to construct a building for the Electric 
Department, consisting of office, garage and stockroom 
facilities, and to determine whether such appropriations 
shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise or take any 
other action with respect thereto. 

Moved by Mr. John Pechilis that $175,000.00 be 
appropriated for constructing a building on town owned 
land on High Street in the Town of Ipswich for the 
Electric Department, consisting of office, garage and 
storage facilities, and that to raise this appropriation the 
treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is authorized 
to borrow $175,000.00 under General Law, Chapter 44, 
Section 8 as amended. Seconded. Finance Committee and 
Selectmen recommended. 



Mr. Pechilis explained that four trucks were going to 
have to be moved from Davis' garage as of April 30. This 
seemed the best solution. Mr. Prosser stated that the 
Planning Board recommended against this article because 
the proposed area is zoned residential, is close to Dow 
Brook, and on a very busy road. Mr. Pechilis argued that 
the state had approved the site and that town boards had 
had ample time to make suggestions. Mr. Tobias spoke in 
favor of the motion and Mr. John Ward reminded voters 
that this would not raise the electrical rate. The motion 
carried with 674 voting in the affirmative, 79 opposed. 

Article 24: To see whether or not the Town will 
reimburse the general fund for payment of execution to 
George Pappas in amount of Four Thousand One 
Hundred Sixty-one Dollars and Sixty Cents ($4,161.60) 
from the Sewer Receipts Reserve Fund. 

Moved by Mr. Paul Gillespie that the sum of $4,161.60 
paid by the Town in satisfaction of an execution secured 
against the town by George Pappas be transferred to the 
General Fund from Sewer Receipts Reserve Fund. 

Mr. Robert Leet, Town Accountant, stated that this 
could not be done, that the transfer had already been 
made. Mr. Gillespie withdrew the motion. 

Article 25: To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purchase of a fence, 
press box and additional seats for the High School 
Athletic field. (Ten Taxpayer's Petition) 

Moved by Mr. Joseph Navarro that the sum of 
$7,200.00 be raised and appropriated for the construction 
of a fence to enclose the high school football field. 
Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. 

Mr. Bob Bateman stated that he could not understand 
how the Finance Committee could recommend cutting 
the school budget and then recommend adding a fence. 
The motion was defeated with 222 voting in the 
affirmative, 573 opposed. 

Article 26: To see if the Town will vote to adopt the 
following By-law: 

No person owning, harboring or having custody and 
control of a dog shall permit such dog to be at large in 
the Town of Ipswich elsewhere than on the premises of 
the owner, except it be on the premises of another person 
with the knowledge and assent of such other person. Any 
dog elsewhere shall from 7:00 A.M. to 10:00 P.M. be 
controlled or restrained by any chain or leash and from 
10:00 P.M. to 7:00 A.M. shall at all times be under the 
direct control and supervision of its owner, or his 
designee. No person owning, harboring or having custody 
and control of a dog shall suffer, permit or allow such a 
dog to commit any nuisance in any park, playground, 
beach, public common or municipal recreation area or 
upon any sidewalk in the Town of Ipswich. Disposition of 
complaints or violation of this by-law will be in 
accordance with the General Law, Chapter 140, Section 
173-A, to wit: 

The Clerk of the District Court shall send a notice to 
the person complained against, and that if such person 
confesses his offense either in person or by mail, the 
charge will be dismissed on the first offense, and there is 
a fine of $2.00 for the second offense, $5.00 for the 



13 



third offense, $10.00 for the fourth and subsequent 
offense. (Ten Taxpayer's Petition) 

Moved by Mr. John Logan that the following by-law of 
the Town of Ipswich be adopted: No person owning, 
harboring or having custody and control of a dog shall 
permit such dog to be at large in the Town of Ipswich 
elsewhere than on the premises of the owner, except it be 
on the premises of another person with the knowledge 
and assent of such other person. Any dog elsewhere shall 
from 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. be controlled or restrained 
by any chain or leash and from 10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. 
shall at all times be under the direct control and 
supervision of its owner, or his designee. No person 
owning, harboring or having custody and control of a dog 
shall suffer, permit or allow such a dog to commit any 
nuisance in any park, playground, beach, public common 
or municipal recreation area or upon any sidewalk in the 
Town of Ipswich. Disposition of complaints or violation 
of this by-law will be in accordance with the General 
Law, Chapter 140, Section 173-A, to wit: 

The Clerk of the District Court shall send a notice to 
the person complained against, and that if such person 
confesses his offense either in person or by mail, the 
charge will be dismissed on the first offense, and there is 
a fine of $2.00 for the second offense, $5.00 for the 
third offense, $10.00 for the fourth and subsequent 
offense. Seconded. Mr. Logan stated that the dog 
population was exploding, and that Ipswich had 735 
registered dogs and over 300 not registered. He and the 
proponents of the by-law thought this a good way to 
control the dogs. Mr. David Scudder stated that the 
Finance Committee recommended against this article. 

Mr. Fred Hines complained that his coat had been torn 
by a dog while he (Mr. Hines) was out walking. Mr. 
William Markos said that he had talked with a man from 
Newton who was working on a model leash law and who 
claims that present leash laws are impossible to enforce. 
Mr. Fred Paulitz, Mrs. Cynthia Sirois, and Mr. Dave 
Walters all spoke in favor of enforcing the present laws 
before making new ones. Mr. Sig Todd urged voters to 
pass this motion, while Mr. Rolland Gallant spoke against 
it. The motion was defeated with 447 voting in the 
affirmative, 482 opposed. 

Article 27: To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
and instruct the Board of Selectmen to increase the pay 
of the "Call" firemen, associated with the Ipswich Fire 
Department, by $100 per year and provide for the 
payment thereof. (Ten Taxpayer's petition) 

Moved by Mr. Jake Burridge that the sum of 
$3,345.00 be raised and appropriated to increase the pay 
of the Call Firemen, associated with the Ipswich Fire 
Department, by $100 per year and provide for the 
payment thereof. Seconded. Finance Committee 
recommended against this article while the Selectmen 
recommended unanimously for this article. 

Mr. George Geanakis, Mrs. A. W. Smith, Mr. Stanley 
Eustace, and Mr. Bob Bateman all spoke in favor of this 
motion. The motion carried with 817 voting in the 
affirmative, 23 opposed. 

Article 28: To see if the Town will amend the 
Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich by 
changing from "four (4)" to "two (2)" the maximum 
number of dwelling units permitted per acre of land in 



PCD Districts, so that paragraph D, sub-paragraph 2 of 
the "Table of Lot and Building Requirements" of the 
Zoning By-Law reads as follows: 

In PCD Districts, the number of dwelling units which 
may be constructed or maintained within the boundary 
lines of such district, or within any lot of land held in 
separate ownership from the remainder of said district, 
shall not exceed two (2) dwelling units per acre of land 
contained in such district or in such separate lot. (Ten 
Taxpayer's Petition) 

Moved by Mr. Hollie Bucklin that the Protective 
Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich be changed from 
"four (4)" to "two (2)" the maximum number of 
dwelling units permitted per acre of land in PCD Districts, 
so that Paragraph D, sub-paragraph 2 of the "Table of 
Lot and Building Requirements" of the Zoning By-Law 
reads as follows: 

In PCD Districts, the number of dwelling units which 
may be constructed or maintained within the boundary 
lines of such district, or within any lot of land held in 
separate ownership from the remainder of said district, 
shall not exceed two (2) dwelling units per acre of land 
contained in such district or in such separate lot. 
Seconded. Finance Committee and Selectmen 
recommended. Conservation Commission recommended. 

Mr. John Prosser stated that the Planning Board voted 
4 to 1 against this article and added that a proposal like 
this should be presented through the Master Plan. Mr. 
Cornelius Cleary, a member of the Master Plan group, 
spoke in favor of this article. The motion carried with 
625 voting in the affirmative, 138 opposed. 



Article 29: To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Protective Zoning Bylaws and the Zoning District Map of 
the Town of Ipswich, dated September 1957, by changing 
from "Single Residence A" to "Limited Industrial" that 
area Northwesterly of Locust Street which is defined as 
follows: Southwesterly from the Northwesterly terminus 
of Locust Street along the Easterly boundary of land of 
the Boston & Maine Railroad 1500 feet; thence on a line 
which runs parallel with and 500 feet Easterly of the 
Boston & Maine Railroad land 1500 feet to the end of 
Locust Street. (Ten Taxpayer's Petition) 

Moved by Mr. William Hayes that the Town amend the 
Protective Zoning By-laws and the Zoning District Map of 
the Town of Ipswich, dated September 1957, by changing 
from "Single Residence A" to "Limited Industrial" that 
area Northwesterly of Locust Street which is defined as 
follows: Southwesterly from the Northwesterly terminus 
of Locust Street along the Easterly boundary of the 
Boston & Maine Railroad 1500 feet; thence on a line 
which runs parallel with and 500 feet Easterly from the 
Boston & Maine Railroad 1500 feet to the end of Locust 
Street. Seconded. Finance Committee and Selectmen 
recommended. Conservation Commission recommended 
and Planning Board recommended 4 to 1 . 

Mr. Hayes explained that a company presently renting 
a building on the property in question would buy the 
property and expand if the area were zoned LI. Mr. 
McLeod added that this company would add to the 
employment opportunities, help the tax rate, and pay a 
substantial amount to the electric department. Mr. 
Terrance Perkins, speaking as an abutter, asked that the 
motion be denied adding that the petitioner already had 



14 



the right to go before the appeal board and expand 100 
percent. Mr. Hayes stated that the building in question 
had already been expanded once; but Mrs. Mildred 
Hulbert, who checked with the Assessors Office, and Mr. 
Perkins, who spoke with the Building Inspector, said it 
had not. Messrs. John Prosser, Robert Weatherall, and 
Donald Huff also spoke in opposition. The motion was 
defeated with 279 voting in the affirmative, 456 opposed. 

Article 30: To see if the Town will accept the layout 
of Mulholland Drive and Pasture Way as a public way. 
(Ten Taxpayer's Petition) 

Moved by Mr. William Hayes that the Town accept the 
layout of Mulholland Drive and Pasture Way as shown 
upon a plan entitled "Plan of Layout of Mulholland Drive 
and Pasture Way at Great Neck, Ipswich, Mass., January, 
1973, Scale 1" = 40', Chester J. Patch Associates, Inc., 
Ipswich, Mass." and on file with the Town Clerk, as a 
public way. Seconded. 

Mr. John Prosser stated that the Planning Board 
unanimously recommended acceptance of this article, 
adding that there were some very minor things yet to be 
fixed. Mr. Gillespie stated that the Board of Selectmen 
unanimously opposed acceptance because it would 
transfer risk from the developer to the town, therefore 
making the request premature. Mr. Hayes and Mr. Prosser 
argued that the roads had been accepted, but Mr. Paulitz 
said that Pasture Way was just a stub of a road. Mr. 
Gillespie then moved that the article be indefinitely 
postponed. Seconded. Finance Committee recommended 
indefinite postponement. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 31: To see what action the Town will take to 
purchase the development rights to a parcel of land 
owned by Sturgis intersecting County Road and 
Lakeman's Lane, Ipswich, amounting to approximately 
twenty-five (25) acres, and to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money therefor. (Ten Taxpayer's Petition) 

Moved by Mr. Fred Winthrop that the Town of 
Ipswich appropriate the sum of twenty thousand dollars 
($20,000.00) in accordance with Mass. General Laws, 
Chapter 184, Section 31, for the purpose of acquiring a 
conservation restriction on a certain parcel of land 
consisting of about 32 acres owned by Roger Sturgis and 
William Sturgis, County Road, Ipswich, Massachusetts, 
subject to confirmation of good title in grantors, the same 
being conveyed by warranty deed from Charles E. Wells 
of Lawrence to Henry E. Sturgis of Ipswich -dated July 5, 
1895 and recorded in the Essex South District Registry 
dated July 22, 1895, in Book 1450 page 200 and being 
described as follows: 

A certain parcel of land consisting of about 32 acres 
and bounded northeasterly by land owned or formerly 
owned by Fellow on the southerly and then southeasterly 
by land formerly owned by Ebenezer Fall, on the 
southwesterly side by the Miles River and on the 
northwesterly side by County Road. This parcel is 
particularly described by metes and bounds in a plot plan 
dated February 28, 1973, by John Alden Goodwin, 
registered surveyor, and annexed hereto as Exhibit A and 
expressly made part of this motion. 



Such restriction shall provide that on said premises no 
development shall be conducted, including the erection of 
any building, dwelling-house, mobile home or other 
structure; nor shall any paving, filling, dumping or 
excavation be permitted except that the Grantors, their 
heirs, successors or assigns may at any time in the future 
construct one single-family residence at any place situate 
on the parcel in conformity with the zoning bylaws of 
the Town of Ipswich. In no event shall there be more 
than one additional building constructed on the entire 
parcel by any or all such persons. Any existing structure 
currently on the property may be improved. 

The foregoing restriction is authorized by G. L. Ch. 
184, Sec. 31-33, and is intended to retain said parcel 
predominantly in its natural, scenic and open condition, 
in agricultural, farming, or forest use in order to protect 
the natural and watershed resources of said town. The 
restriction shall be administered by the conservation 
commission of said town, established under G. L. Ch. 40, 
Sec. 8C. 

The conservation restriction hereby conveyed does not 
grant either the town or the public any right to enter said 
parcel except as follows: 

1. We grant to the town a permanent easement of 
access to enter said parcel, by its conservation 
commission, for the purpose of inspecting the premises 
and enforcing the foregoing restrictions and remedying 
any violation thereof. The right hereby granted shall be in 
addition to any other remedies available to the town for 
the enforcement of the foregoing restrictions. 

The town and its inhabitants shall acquire an easement 
to pass and repass upon said parcel on foot for purpose 
of fishing, hiking, canoeing, nature study or cross-country 
skiing. 

The foregoing covenant, eastment and restriction shall 
run with the land and bind the Grantor's successors, heirs 
or assigns in title to the premises and inure to the benefit 
of the general public and the inhabitants of said town in 
perpetuity. Seconded. 



The town and its inhabitants shall acquire a 
conservation restriction and recreational easement as 
described above and all rights not expressly given herein 
are reserved to the grantors including the right to conduct 
any type of agricultural, farming or forestry activity 
thereon, and this covenant is to be construed so as not to 
interfere therewith in any respect. 

Mr. George of the Conservation Commission explained 
that this article would serve to conserve green space in 
our area and that the town would receive 50 percent 
reimbursement. Mr. Markos stated that the Finance 
Committee voted 5 to 4 against this article and asked if 
the Selectmen had seen and read both available appraisals. 
Mr. Gillespie answered that they had not, but that he 
(Mr. Gillespie) urged support of this article. Mr. Markos 
argued that the article had been loosely drawn and should 
be prepared properly. The Planning Board opposed this 
article, while Mr. Roger Burke and Mr. Curtis Tuttle 
spoke in favor. The article lost with 443 voting in the 
affirmative, 284 opposed. A two thirds vote, or 487, was 
necessary to carry the article. 



15 



Article 32: To see whether the Town will approve the 
construction of a new housing project by The Ipswich 
Housing Authority; namely a Housing Project for Elderly 
Persons, pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 667 of 
Massachusetts Acts of 1954, and Acts in amendment 
thereof and addition thereto to be known as State Aided 
Housing Project 667-4. (Housing Authority Petition) 



Moved by Mr. Glenfred Wanzer that the Town of 
Ipswich hereby approve construction of a new housing 
project; namely a project for the Housing of Elderly 
Persons, consisting of not more than 100 dwelling units, 
pursuant to Chapter 667 of Massachusetts Act of 1954 
and Acts in Amendment thereof and in addition thereto 
to be known as State Aided Project 667-4. Seconded. 
Finance Committee and Selectmen recommended. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote. 



BALLOTING DAY 
MONDAY, MARCH 12, 1973 

ARTICLE 14 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

The ballots were prepared by the Moderator and Town 
Clerk in accordance with the Town By-Laws. 

The result of the ballot vote was as follows: 



Yes 


2,390 


No 


817 


Blank 


329 


Total 


3,536 



The motion carried. 



ATTEST 



Article 33: To see what action the town will take to 
amend The Zoning By-Laws by the addition of the 
following section entitled "Flood Plain and Wetland 
District", copy of said section and map referred to 
therein on file at the Town Clerk's office. (Sponsored by 
the Ipswich Conservation Commission) 

Moved by Mr. William Hickling that the Protective 
Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich 1970 as amended, 
be amended by the addition of a new Section Ten, 
entitled, "Floodplain and Wetland District", a copy of 
which has been on file at the Town Clerk's office along 
with the map referred to therein, and also published in 
The Ipswich Chronicle. Seconded. 

Mr. Prosser announced that the vote of the Planning 
Board was 3 in opposition, 1 abstention, 1 in favor, and 
suggested that the article be put off for perhaps 6 months 
or so to allow more study. The Finance Committee voted 
5 in opposition, 4 in favor as stated by Mr. Markos, but 
Mr. Scudder (also of the Finance Committee) spoke in 
favor of the article adding that it would give the town a 
chance to look ahead. Mr. Raymond Sullivan and Mr. 
Dale Vincent spoke against this motion agreeing that the 
map was unfair and inaccurate. Mr. Dan Wendell spoke in 
opposition, but Mr. Gillespie stated that this would 
benefit the future of Ipswich. 

Article 33 lost with 402 voting in the affirmative, 336 
opposed. A two thirds vote, or 494, was needed to carry 
the motion. 



A motion was made and seconded that the Meeting be 
dissolved. Carried by voice vote. The Moderator declared 
the Meeting dissolved at 11:01 p.m. 



Harold G. Comeau 
Town Clerk 



ATTEST 



Harold G. Comeau 
Town Clerk 



* 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 



* 



Essex, ss. 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County. 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
you are hereby directed to notify the Inhabitants of the 
Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town affairs, to 
meet at the IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL, in said Ipswich on 
MONDAY, THE ELEVENTH DAY OF JUNE, 1973 at 
7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to act on the 
following articles, viz: 

Article 1 : To see if the Town will amend the By-Laws 
of the Town of Ipswich, as adopted at the Annual Town 
Meeting on March 5, 1973, by adding the following 
paragraph at the end of Section 1 of Chapter XV thereof: 

(e) No person shall on any street, sidewalk, or public 
place, without a written permit from the Board of 
Selectmen, consume any alcoholic beverage or possess any 
opened container, full or partially full, of any alcoholic 
beverage. 

Article 2: To see if the Town will pay to the widow of 
former Fire Chief, Russell Scahill, that compensation due 
to the Fire Chief under Chapter 1082, Laws of 1971. 

Article 3: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
a sum of money to construct a building for the Electric 
Department consisting of office, garage and stockroom 
facilities, and to determine whether such appropriations 
shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise or take any 
other action with respect thereto. 

Article 4: To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen, as Water Commissioners, in accordance with 
General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 15 A to transfer 
approximately five (5) acres of land on Mile Lane under 
the control of the Water Commissioners and no longer 



16 



needed for the Water Department of the town, to the 
control of the Electric Light Commissioners for the 
purpose of use by the Electric Light Department as a site 
for a garage, storage, offices, parking or otherwise. 

Article 5: To see what action the Town will take in 
regards to amending the motion on Article 6, Annual 
Town Meeting, March 5, 1973. 

Article 6: To see if the Town will appropriate a sum 
of money for engineering work, survey and plans, for the 
Town Dump in order to meet requirements prescribed by 
the State Department of Public Health. 

Article 7: To see whether or not the Town will accept 
provisions of Chapter 48, Section 36A of the General 
Laws with respect to the appointment of call and part-call 
firemen to the regular force. 

Article 8: To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to sell and convey the following 
parcel of land to Kenneth MacLeod, namely: The land 
which comprised the Old North Gate Road and which has 
been abandoned since the construction of the present 
North Gate Road. The road is bounded by land presently 
owned by Kenneth MacLeod and land owned by McFaun 
and by Raymond. 

Article 9: To see what action the town will take to 
purchase the development rights to a parcel of land 
owned by Sturgis intersecting County Road and 
Lakeman's Lane, Ipswich, amounting to approximately 
twenty five (25) acres and to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money therefore. 

The official count of the evening was 314 voters 
present, with the required quorum being 346. At 7:35 
p.m., with 214 voters present, Mr. Navarro moved that 
the opening of the meeting be postponed 15 minutes. 
Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

At 7:55, with 253 voters present, Mr. Navarro moved 
that the meeting be continued to 7:30 p.m. on the 18th 
of June. Seconded. Majority voice vote. 




Harold Shively 
Newly Elected Moderator Shively conducted the 1973 Special 
Town Meeting. (Ipswich Chronicle) 



JUNE 18, 1973 

Moderator Shively announced that at 7:30 p.m. there 
was an unofficial count of 183 voters present. Mr. 
Navarro moved that the start of the meeting be delayed 
15 minutes. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

At 7:45 p.m., with only 296 voters present, Mr. 
Navarro moved that the meeting be dissolved. Seconded. 
Unanimous voice vote. 

ATTEST 

Harold G. Comeau 
Town Clerk 




17 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Charles Cobb 

Joseph Navarro, Chairman 

Paul Gillespie 

Ed Kozeneski 

Jack Pickard 

The year 1973 was an eventful year for the Town. 
We saw two major problems of the Town resolved with 
the start of construction of a new Municipal Light 
Building, thereby providing much needed office and 
garage space to the Light Department and coincidentally 
freeing up space in the present building for offices 
which are overly crowded at present. 

Secondly, the start of construction of the much 
needed sewer to the South Side of Town. Initially this 
sewer will service the Southern Heights and Southern 
Manor area, but it puts the sewer within reach of the 
areas close by, some of which are in need of this 
service. 

This year also saw the Tax Rate decrease to $55.00 
which was significant in a year which saw most 
communities receiving increases. Again, in addition to 
the Revenue Sharing Funds much credit goes to the 
Assessors, The Treasurer, and the Finance Committee, in 
particular, Former Chairman Bill Markos, current 
chairman Charles Dalton who spent many long hours 
with the Town Accountant to arrive at a budget figure 
with which the Town could retain its excellent financial 
status. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
(seated) Charles Cobb; Joseph Navarro, Chairman; Paul Gillespie; 
(standing) Ed Kozeneski; Jack Pickard. 



With the resignation of Mr. Conti the Board and the 
Town were most fortunate in obtaining the services of 
former Selectman Nathaniel M. Quint to act as 
Temporary Town Manager. 

We can only repeat what we have said so many times 
before, that his assistance and performance, in the 
Towns hour of need were most commendable. 

Our sincere thanks to you, Nat. 

In November, we hired Mr. Leonard Silvia of Norton, 
Mass. as our new Town Manager. Mr. Silvia has 
impressed us as a frank, open and sincere person. We are 
sure that as each of you come in contact with him you 
will agree. Already, in a meeting with the members of 
the Board, and the offices of the Employees Union, 
expressions of satisfaction with his forthrightness were 
expressed by those who were in attendance. 

With the gloomy forecasts all around us with regard 
to oil shortages, energy crisis, unemployment and the 
high cost of living we anticipate a year of hard work 
ahead of the Board in order that in whatever way 
possible we can assist the Town in easing the burden. 



18 




IN MEMORIAM 



Elizabeth "Betty " Cole 



(Ipswich Today) 



This year Ipswich lost a loyal and devoted servant in 
Mrs. Elizabeth "Betty" Cole. She typified all that is 
good in government with her honest and sincere ap- 
proach to whatever task she faced. 

Those of us who were fortunate to know her and 
served with her will remember her not so much because 
she was our first Selectwoman but more because of her 
warm and human approach to the problems facing 
Ipswich and its people. 

In these days of abuse of public trust, misuse of 
power and so forth I would hope that those of us 
remaining and those who will follow will dedicate our- 
selves to those principals of Service and Integrity which 
Betty held so dear. 

In closing I can only say that, Betty, wherever you 
are we are richer for having known you. 

Signed by, 

Joseph A. Navarro 

Chairman, Board of Selectmen 




19 



JURY DUTY 



List of Jurors Drawn in 1973 



Chester S. Bartnicki 

15 Second Street 
Henry A. Beckingham 

126 County Road 
Robert W. Colter 

260 High Street 
John F. Conley 

31 High Street 
William George 

12 Water Street 
Sigrid von Toll Hart 

126 Argilla Road 
Carroll B. Hills 

22 Labor-In-Vain Road 
Virginia P. Hinckley 

56 Newmarch Street 
Charles S. Hood 

294 Linebrook Road 
Ellen Osgood Jennings 

199 Argilla Road 
Marlys K. Kerr 

12 Goldfinch Way 
Anne C. Kuconis 

225 Linebrook Road 



Gregory M. Logan 

43 High Street 
Alvery E. Merriott 

14£ Market Street 
Christina Malenfant 

45 North Perley 
Albert L. Meunier 

13 Pleasant Street 
Norman L. MacLeod 

109 High Street 
Beatrice Radzinski 

15 Spiller's Lane 
Ruth G. Regan 

47 South Main Street 
Elizabeth D. Savage 

291 Linebrook Road 
William C. Thomas 

18 Arrowhead Trail 
Stanley Trocki 

13 Peatfield Street 
Sarah L. Weatherall 

40 East Street 



ELIGIBLE FOR JURY DUTY 



Names Eligible to be Drawn for Jury Duty in 1974 



MALE 

Edward Antkowiak 

County Road 
Robert T. Bamford 

Mill Road 
Robert E. Buttrick 

29 Newmarch Street 
Lawrence E. Cummings 

100 Little Neck Road 
Edwin H. Damon 

15 Eagle Hill Road 
Percy R. Dort, Jr. 

5 Mineral Street 
G. Mark Hayes 

64 County Road 
Richard S. Hodgkins 

76 East Street 
Alister N.D. Hyde 

12 Lakeman's Lane 
Peter Johnson 

10 Putnam Road 
David R. Knowlton 

56 Fellow's Road 



Irving M. Lippoldt 

1 1 Mile Lane 
Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. 

Labor-In-Vain Road 
John J. Michon, Sr. 

14 Oakhurst Avenue 
Clayton J. McKay 

13 Brownville Avenue 
Fred Paulitz 

North Ridge Road 
Kenneth E. Poor 

8 Wainwright Street 
James D. Smyth 

31 Labor-In-Vain Road 
John G. Thatcher, Jr. 

43 Upper River Road 
Keith Mike Wallace 

56 North Main Street 
John H. Ward 

98 Linebrook Road 
John Wegzyn 

63 Linebrook Road 



FEMALE 

Catherine V. Abbott 

10 Vermette Court 
Anita M. Buttrick 

29 Newmarch Street 
Beverly C. Coates 

Argilla Road 
Jean Duke 

28 Mt. Pleasant Avenue 
Joyce A. Gysan 

146 County Road 
Ruth Christian Home 

41 Linebrook Road 
Nancy P. Johnstone 

23 Newmarch Street 
Helen B. McGarty 

County Road 
Elizabeth E. Phillips 

Argilla Road 



20 



TOWN MANAGERS REPORT 




TOWN MANAGER 

Leonard J. Silvia 

Legally, the purpose of a town report is to notify 
the citizens of the community of the activities and 
programs undertaken throughout the year. It is a sound 
businesslike practice and we hope this report is 
sufficient in depth, detail and information to serve that 
purpose. 

Keep in mind the many hours it takes, many on a 
volunteer basis, to accomplish these activities and 
programs. Keep in mind these programs and activities 
are determined by the implied or explicit wishes of the 
townspeople. Keep in mind also, particularly the 
volunteer hours, that this certainly is the dedication of 
townspeople for the benefit of their fellow townspeople. 



The residents of Ipswich have always taken particular 
pride in their community and this pride has been 
expressed by participating in its affairs and helping to 
guide its destiny. This is certainly a community rich 
with culture and tradition. In the years to come we 



cannot and should not weaken our standards of 
excellence; we cannot and should not set but the 
highest goals for ourselves; and therefore we can and 
should continue to be a leader in the blending of those 
principles and ingredients that insure a stable, 
democratic, model-community life. 

The decisions that will have to be made to retain 
this balance that we are so fortunate to have will not 
be easy ones. They will concern not only those 
problems that threaten the existence of civilization as 
we know it. It would seem unreasonable and impossible 
to blindly limit our concerns to our town borders while 
the world around us decays. These decisions, or the 
analysis of these decisions, may have to test some 
concepts or standards that we presently take for 
granted. 

The world's towns, states and nations have been 
geared to be dependent upon growth. The handwriting 
is on the wall we cannot continue on this course of 
expansion without disaster ous results. Such growth 
continues to deplete our natural resources at an 
alarming rate. A concerted drive must be made for 
stabilization. It will mean doing with less rather than 
asking for more; it will mean reversing or rearranging 
our commonly accepted needs; it will mean foremost, 
that the matter will have to be faced directly and 
honestly. This indeed is an awesome challenge because 
our everyday lives do not allow time for such 
contemplation. 

These sacrifices and inconveniences can exert a 
positive influence in many ways: participating in 
recycling programs; protecting our farms and open 
spaces; controlling our use of water, power and fuel 
needs; reviewing our moral and social principles that 
may contribute to developing the impending imbalance; 
and so forth. 

Our town deliberations will shift from the current, 
obvious, routine and mundane problems with which we 
normally struggle, and lift our sights to those which, if 
not considered, will make our present ones an exercise 
in futility. 

This my first manager report is, therefore, more 
philosophical than functional. However, since my 1973 
experience has been of short duration any observations 
would be premature. 




21 



VITAL STATISTICS 




VITAL STATISTICS 

Harold Comeau, Town Clerk 

Comparative Vital Statistics recorded for the past 
four years: 



Births 

Deaths 

Marriages 



All the births recorded were to Ipswich residents 
(Male 67 - Female 48). Of the total number of deaths 
recorded 90 were Ipswich residents (Male 53 - Female 
37). The age of the oldest Ipswich resident was 94 
years, 5 months and 29 days. 



1970 


1971 


1972 


1973 


154 


149 


109 


115 


109 


141 


154 


140 


131 


121 


123 


137 



DOG LICENSES 




1972 




1973 


Males 




403 




496 


Females 




55 




47 


Spayed Females 




268 




295 


Kennels 




6 




7 


TOTALS 




732 




845 


CLAM PERMITS 




1972 




1973 


Residents 




800 




711 


Non-resident Daily 




384 




307 


Non-resident Yearly 




236 




197 


TOTALS 




1420 




1215 


REGISTERED VOTERS (as of December 


31, 1973 




Demo 


- Repub- 


Unen- 




Precinct 


crats 


licans 


rolled 


Total 


I 


249 


556 


541 


1346 


II 


416 


643 


822 


1881 


III 


226 


451 


711 


1388 


IV 


424 


466 


778 


1668 


Total 


1315 


2116 


2852 


6283 



March 12, 1973 from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. The 
voting machine in Precinct I registered 830 ballots cast, 
Precinct II registered 1066 ballots cast, Precinct III 
registered 733 ballots cast, and Precinct IV registered 
999 ballots cast. 



MODERATOR 

Mark Apsey 
John A. Pechilis 
♦Harold E. Shively 
George A. Singer 
Blank 

SELECTMEN 

Elizabeth S. Cole 
*John M. Pickard 
Brainard C. Wallace 
Hollie Bucklin 
Blank 

CONSTABLE 

*Bernie Spencer 
David Welsh 
Blank 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Rainer Broekel 
♦Walter J. Pojasek 
♦Peter R. Greer 

M. Patricia Manning 

Leland G. Wood 

Peter A. Zervas 

Blank 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 
♦John G. Thatcher 

Peter A. Johnson 

Blank 



Pre. 


Pre. 


Pre. 


Pre. 


I 


II 


Ill 


IV Total 


162 


240 


181 


207 790 


251 


343 


232 


420 1246 


402 


459 


304 


342 1507 


— 


— 


1 


1 


15 


24 


15 


30 84 


419 


432 


335 


295 1481 


357 


547 


340 


570 1814 


37 


65 

1 
21 


38 


101 241 

1 

33 91 


17 


20 



626 798 561 739 2724 

143 197 130 165 635 

61 71 42 95 269 



326 370 289 212 1197 

315 457 302 616 1690 

434 475 350 373 1632 

265 390 208 393 1256 

90 123 79 45 337 

92 163 133 196 584 

138 154 105 163 560 



600 703 465 581 2349 

165 270 195 309 939 

65 93 73 109 340 



ELECTIONS 

The annual meeting for the election of Town officers 
was held in accordance with the warrant on Monday, 



And to Vote "Yes" or "No" to the following questions: 

QUESTION NO. 1 

"Shall this town approve the Charter Amendments to 
the Town Charter, Chapter 620 of the Acts of 1966, 
proposed by the Annual Town Meeting, March 06, 
1972, by amending Section 22 of the Charter entitled 
'Electric Light Department' as follows: by striking out 
the words 'to whom the Board of Selectmen shall 
delegate its duties and responsibilities as electric light 
commissioners' and inserting the words 'who shall be 
responsible to the Board of Selectmen as electric light 
commissioners', this amendment, if approved by a 
majority of the voters, to take effect upon certification 
of the balloting by the Town Clerk?" 

The above Question was voted on one ballot at the 
respective precinct polling places on Monday, March 12, 
1973 as follows: 

Yes 493 665 

No 227 255 

Blank 110 146 



461 582 2201 

184 229 895 

88 188 532 



Total 



830 1066 733 999 3628 



22 



QUESTION NO. 2 

"Shall this town approve the Charter Amendments to 
the Town Charter, Chapter 620 of the Acts of 1966, 
proposed by the Annual Town Meeting, March 06, 
1972, by amending Section 21 of the Charter entitled 
'Department of Public Works' as follows: by deleting 
the words 'water commissioners, sewer commissioners' 
from the second sentence of said section and adding the 
following sentence: 'The Board of Selectmen shall 
assume all the powers and duties heretofore delegated to 
the Water Commissioners and Sewer Commissioners' and 
by striking the word 'he' at the beginning of the third 
sentence of said section and replacing it by the words 
'The Town Manager', this amendment, if approved by 
majority of the voters, to take effect upon certification 
of the balloting by the Town Clerk?" 

The above Question was voted on one ballot at the 

respective precinct polling places on Monday, March 12, 
1973 as follows: 

Yes 474 648 447 561 2130 

No 240 265 194 245 944 

Blank 116 153 92 193 554 

Total 830 1066 733 999 3628 



ELECTION OFFICERS: 

Precinct I — Warden: Hazel Grant; Clerk: Gertrude 
Conley; Dep. Chk/Warden: Doris Chambers; Inspectors: 
Alida Wile, Gertrude Smythe, Annie Morgan, Barbara 
Stone. 

Precinct II — Warden: Thelma Cummings; Clerk: Jean 
Bucklin; Dep. Chk/Warden: Eleanor Perkins; Inspectors: 
Mary Jodoin, Beatrice Radzinski, Thelma Vose, *short 
due to last minute sickness. 

Precinct III — Warden: Marion Reedy; Clerk: Helen 
Cooke; Dep. Chk/Warden: Martha Brennan; Inspectors: 
Guy Reedy, Barbara Robishaw, Mary Ross, *short due 
to last minute sickness. 

Precinct IV — Warden: Alice Trocki; Clerk: Theresa 
Beauregard; Dep Chk/Warden: Cynthia Burns; Inspectors: 
Catherine Comeau, Janice Marcaurelle, Julia Goot, 
Blanch Hubbard. 




YOUTH COMMISSION 



YOUTH COMMISSION 

Cathleen R. McGinley, Director 
W. Robert Russell M.S., Chairman 

1973 has been a landmark of progress for the Youth 
Commission. Continual and expanded programs have 
been made possible by the continued support of the 
town and its citizens. Major activities the Youth 
Commission has been responsible for include the 
following: 

Clean Up & Beautification of the River Walk 

A 2 Act Play produced & directed by the Young 

People entitled "Mystery of the Gymdrop Dragon" 
Participation in Old Ipswich Days 
Arts & Crafts Programs 
3 Summer Concerts 
Fall Mountain Climbing Trip 
Series of Parents Programs with Dr. Alan Siegel "A 

Better Understanding of Your Teens." 
Counseling for disturbed young people 
Monthly Movies at the Center 
6 Dances 
Formation of a Steering Committee comprised of 12 

Young People 
Christmas Fair 



Special thanks are extended to the volunteers who 
gave so freely of their time to assist our youth towards 
a bright future; to the Friends of Ipswich Youth for 
their continual support and assistance and to the Police 
Chief and his department for their interest and 
cooperation. The many contributions and donations of 



furniture from the Community have been sincerely 
appreciated. 

"CHILDREN ARE THE WORLDS MOST 
VALUABLE RESOURCE AND ITS BEST HOPE FOR 
THE FUTURE" "John F. Kennedy" 




Youths at work cleaning River Walk. Three truckloads of debris 
were carried away. (Ipswich Chronicle) 



23 



PLANNING BOARD 



TOWN COUNSEL 



PLANNING BOARD 

Jason A. Sokolov, Chairman 

During 1973 the Planning Board's major effort was 
directed toward advancing the progress of the Master 
Planning effort, with strong support from the Planning 
Advisory Committee. This has resulted in proposed 
Wetlands Zoning and sign regulation amendments to the 
Zoning By-law, economic models, planning map overlays, 
continued work on the Subdivision Control Regulations, 
and a Progress Report to be presented to the Town. 

The Board approved the Bayview Subdivision while 
rejecting two preliminary plans for Country Club of 
Ipswich and the definitive plan of A. B. Clark, Sec. II. 
The latter has an appeal pending in Superior Court, and 
Country Club of Ipswich has submitted a definitive plan 
which is currently pending before the Board. 

Regular meetings were held on a bi-weekly schedule, 
while special meetings and hearings were held as 
required. Recommendations were made to the Board of 
Appeals and Conservation Commission on hearings held 
by them. Joint meetings were held with the Selectmen, 
Board of Health, and Conservation Commission. 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

James Theodosopoulos, Chairman 

In 1973 the Board held thirty duly advertised public 
hearings. This is the second highest number of hearings 
in the Board's history. Of the thirty petitions, sixteen 
were granted, ten were denied, and four were 
withdrawn. 

Of the sixteen petitions granted, four concerned lot 
or yard requirements, three related to additions to 
existing buildings, two permitted the keeping of horses 
for family use, two permitted temporary occupancy of a 
trailer, and there were one each for a swimming pool, a 
greenhouse, a day care center, a nursing home, and a 
tennis-recreational facility. 

Of the ten petitions denied, six concerned lot or 

yard requirements, and there were one each for a 

building addition, an increase in the number of 

apartments, a boat-selling business in a residential 
neighborhood, and a shopping center. 

The Zoning By-law was amended at the Annual 
Town Meeting to reduce the permitted number of 
dwelling units in the PCD District from four per acre to 
two per acre. 

After the Annual Town Meeting, the Board of 
Selectmen reappointed S. Harold Perley as a member 
and Sharon Josephson and William J. Murphy as 
Associate Members. 




TOWN COUNSEL 

F. Dale Vincent 

In addition to the regular advisory services furnished 
town officials and Boards throughout the past year, the 
past year was a particularly active one for litigation in 
which the town or one of its boards or officials was 
involved. Three cases involving hearings in Superior 
Court involving the town were disposed of, all favorably 
to the town. One case in Probate Court involving the 
alteration of the Library trusts to allow takeover by the 
town of the trust assets and operation of the library by 
the town under the General Laws of the State by nine 
trustees appointed by the Selectmen, was heard in 
Probate Court and a consent decree acceptable to the 
Attorney General, the present Library Trustees and the 
town was achieved. Two cases presently pending in 
Superior Court involve the scope of authority of the 
Board of Health and the Planning Board. There have 
been three hearings in Boston with regard to the case 
against the Board of Health, and one lengthy trial in 
Salem of the case in which both Boards were involved. 
Neither case has been finally completed and as of the 
first of the year decision of the latter case is still 
awaited. 

There has also been an increase in appeals from 
decisions of the Board of Appeals involving zoning 
matters. Two cases of this nature were heard in the 
District Court in Ipswich and disposed of favorably to 
the town. One such case is still pending in the District 
Court and three in Superior Court. 

There are presently five cases in Superior Court 
awaiting trial involving claims against the town for 
personal injuries or property damage, and one such suit 
in District Court. There is also a suit in Superior Court 
by the town against a developer for breach of his 
agreement with the town Planning Board. 



24 



ASSESSING 




ASSESSORS OFFICE 

Varnum S. Pedrick, Chief Assessor 

ASSESSMENTS: The total of real estate and personal 
property for 1973 is $69,424,999. This is an increase of 
$2,919,992. over 1972. This is the greatest gain in 
valuation in the history of Ipswich, except 1965 over 
1964, but that was due to revaluation of all real estate. 
Our gain in value, plus other lesser factors, enabled us 
to drop the rate by $1.00 per thousand despite the 
increase of expenditures. 

This office also committed 8376 motor vehicle bills 
for a total of $6,711,210. value and $343,944. in taxes 
for collection, a gain of nearly $50,000 over 1972. 

The issuing of over 190 building permits indicates an 
increase of new construction, remodeling, etc. of more 
than 25% over 1972. The financial future of the Town 
appears to me to be more roseate than some of my 
co-workers' prophesy. 




TREASURER - COLLECTOR 



TREASURER-COLLECTOR 

George C. Mourikas 

My Assistant Treasurer, Sophie L. Rygielski, Deputy 
Tax Collectors, Gloria S. Klimaszewski and Gladys A. 
Wegzyn have been working diligently and were able to 
collect over 99% of the Taxes. 

The duties of my office staff have doubled due to 
the Fiscal Year, and Revenue Sharing which requires an 
extra set of books and files. Revenue Sharing is a 
complete separate operation with a separate Quarterly 
report sent to the Bureau of Accounts. The Fiscal Year 
involves 2 Committments for Real Estate and Personal 
Property Taxes, doubling the volume of Bookkeeping 
and Collections in our office. 

The Sale and Transfer of Real Estate Property has 
increased tremendously requiring more Certificates of 
Municipal Liens issued. 

I want to thank the Board of Selectmen, Town 
Manager, and Finance Committee for their help and 
cooperation throughout the past year. 




TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 
AND TREASURER-COLLECTOR 

I to r: John Beagen, Mark Apsey, George Maurikas (Treas.-Coll) 

and Peter Owsiak 



25 



FINANCE 



ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 

Robert H. Leet, Accountant 

The Accounting Department performs many and 
various functions during the year which are very 
necessary and important in maintaining the Town's 
stability. 

All the general financial records of the Town are 
maintained in this office by our devoted and 
conscientious employees. Their primary duties are: 
processing all Town payrolls and bill vouchers, 
maintaining health and life insurance records, and 
handling various other problems which arise. 

The annual budget, both preliminary and final, was 
prepared and distributed. Also the financial section of 
the Town Report was compiled. Various other reports 
were prepared for the following: Bureau of Accounts, 



State Tax Commission, Bureau of Census-Federal, 
various banks, town departments and committees, 
research bureaus, and other financial institutions - 
showing the complete financial transactions and 
condition of the Town. 

We have been busy preparing for the fiscal year 
change which should prove to be interesting and 
possibly chaotic. 

Detailed financial statements for the year 1973 are 
set forth in the colored pages of this report. 




HISTORICAL COMMISSION 




HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John Conley, Chairman 

The Ipswich Historical Commission has spent the 
greater part of its efforts during the past year in 
preparation for the publishing of its report on the Pilot 
Demonstration Project on historic preservation through 
the use of easements. Mr. David Johnson, the 
Government Technical Representative from the U.S. 
Department of Housing and Urban Development, came 
to Ipswich on two occasions to confer with the 
Commission on the project. The final draft was 
submitted to H.U.D. in August. 

In December the Commission received approval of 
the draft for publishing with some suggestions for 
editorial changes. 



The letter of approval also stated, in part, "The 
survey which the Commission conducted to identify the 
properties for which easements would eventually be 
negotiated has produced valuable documentation on the 
historical and architectural significance of early buildings 
throughout Ipswich. Such a survey is essential to the 
development of a comprehensive preservation program 
for any community. We would hope that the Ipswich 
Commission will continue this work to identify and 
document significant properties of later date and that 
copies of all these materials will be forwarded to 
Massachusetts Historical Commission for inclusion in the 
official inventory of the Commonwealth's historic assets. 
The survey and *the project as a whole have generated 
increased public awareness of Ipswich's historic assets, of 
the need for coordinated local efforts for their 
preservation, and of the Ipswich Historical Commission 
as the official town agency capable of providing the 
coordination. Finally, sixteen easements have been 
acquired by the Ipswich Commission on behalf of the 
town, marking the first direct involvement of local 
government in historic preservation." 

The Commission, whose members had in the past 
served as an Historic District Study Committee, invited 
Mrs. Polly Rettig of the Massachusetts Historical 
Commission to confer with them concerning the 
re-activating of such a Study Committee. The Board of 
Selectmen concurred in the matter, and reappointed the 
members of the Commission to a new Historic District 
Study Committee. 

The Commission received several requests for 
genealogical and historical information; these were 
researched and answered. The Commission also 
continued its program of maintenance of the plaques 
affixed to the historic homes about the Town. 

The members of the Commission are serving on the 
historical section of the Bicentennial Committee. 



26 



FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
For the Town of 
IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 



Year Ending December 31, 1973 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 

MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET -DECEMBER 31, 1973 



ASSETS 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



CASH 








Premium on Loans 




565.15 


General 




2,449,978.81 




Interest on Loans Issued 




106.67 


Revenue Sharing 




59,973.19 










Petty: 








Agency: 






Accounting 




5.00 




County Dog Collection 




75.75 


Schools 




25.00 










Electric 




375.00 




Payroll Deductions: 






Advance 








Retirement Withholding 


5 


,398.17 


Payrolls 




41.71 




Union 




224.50 






2,510,398. 


71 


State Withholding 

Health Insurance Deductions 


9 
5 


,906.39 
,687.10 


CERTIFICATE OF DEPO: T: 






-Paid in 




476.52 


Federal Revenue 


Sharing 


100,000.00 




-Consortium 




75.90 






100,000. 


00 


O.M.E. -Deduction 

-Paid in 




94.78 
211.20 


ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLES: 






Life Insurance-Deduction 




202.57 


Taxes: 








-Paid in 




15.33 



Levy of 1966 

Personal Property 
Levy of 1967 

Personal Property 
Levy of 1969 

Personal Property 
Levy of 1970 

Personal Property 
Levy of 1971 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1972 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1973 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1974 

Real Estate 



Excise: 

Motor Vehicle 

Levy of 1964 

Levy of 1965 

Levy of 1966 

Levy of 1967 

Levy of 1968 

Levy of 1969 

Levy of 1970 

Levy of 1971 

Levy of 1972 

Levy of 1973 



3.30 

56.25 

110.40 

2 78.60 

310.80 
802.31 

407.40 
7,314.65 

5,784.18 
63,150.88 

(53.63 ) 
78,165.14 



1,560.38 
2,801.31 

290.41 
1,333.02 

382 . 49 

303.94 

1,310.82 

1,640.48 

7,932.62 

34,531.05 

52,086.52 



-Consortium 
Annuities 
Clothing Allowance 



1.65 
724.45 
174.64 





23,193.20 


Guarantee Deposits: 




Electric Meter 


11,692.00 


Meter Income 


2,976.00 


Contract Performance 


26,000.00 




40,668.00 


Overestimates : 




County Tax 


52,943.78 


State Recreation 


4,710.86 


Metro Air Pollution 


39.21 


Mosquito Control 


1,825.42 


Ipswich River Watershed 


379.16 



Tailings : 

Unclaimed Checks 

Gifts and Bequests : 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 
Ipswich Fairways Inc. 



Federal Grants : 
Schools: 

National Defense Title III 
Vocational Education 
ESEA Title I 73-144-037 
ESEA Title I 74-144-012 
ESEA Title II F 4-1972 



59,898.43 



4,867.08 



480.00 
10,000.00 
10,480.00 



3,650.26 

12.28 

317.20 

8,686.70 
15.40 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 

MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET-DECEMBER 31, 1973 



ASSETS 



LIABILITIES 6c RESERVES 



Excise: (Cont.) 
Farm Animal 
Levy of 1973 



Special Taxes : 
In Litigation 



Tax Title and Possessions : 
Tax Titles 
Tax Possessions 



Special Assessments: 
Sewer to Taxes: 

Levy of 1972 

Levy of 1973 
Apportioned Paid in Advance 
Committed Interest: 

Levy of 1972 

Levy of 1973 



Departmental: 
Town Property 
Engineering 
Health 

Veterans Service 
Highway Machinery 
Cemetery 
Education 



Municipal Electric : 
Rates & Charges 



Water : 

Liens Added to Taxes: 
Levy of 1971 
Levy of 1972 
Levy of 1973 
Rates & Charges 



Sewer : 

Liens Added to Taxes: 

Levy of 1971 

Levy of 1972 

Levy of 1973 
Rates & Charges 



77.00 



77.00 



1,706.35 
1,706.35 



23,449.19 
7,809.28 
31,258.47 



139.37 
8,010.11 
(26.50) 

5.67 
304.07 





8,< 


i32. 


72 


1 


,149, 


.85 






45, 


.00 






172, 


.14 




61 


,423, 


.60 






690, 


.63 






118. 


,50 




(3 


,058, 


,07) 






60,: 


>41. 


65 


183 


,117. 


,03 





183,117.03 



;62.63 
(104.03) 
1,151.02 
34,935.72 
36,145.34 



23.52 
(71.77) 
62.74 
28,294.25 
28,308.74 



Federal Grant : 
Schools: 

ESEA Title II F4-1973 
ESEA Title II Project 
PL 91-230 Title VIB 1972 

1973 
Education Training Teachers 
of Handicapped Children 
Historic District-HUD 



State Grants : 

Youth Commission 
Shellfish 
Highway Aid 



Revolving Funds : 

Cafeteria 

Athletics 

Police 
Other 



Veterans District 

Other Funds : 

Highway Mach. Fund 
Sale of Cemetery Lots 
Conservation 
Manning 



3,467.77 

291.68 

210.70 
2,965.43 

1,500.00 
5,134.77 
26,252.19 



1,620.31 
1,268.00 
50,844.00 
53,732.31 



9,164.10 

10,843.78 

228.00 

30.00 

20,265.88 

6,425.32 



25.00 

7,299.95 

17,156.04 

297.75 

24,778.74 



Operating Balance s: 
Appropriation Control 
Appropriation Control- 

Revenue Sharing 
Electric: 
Operation 
Construction 
Bond Proceeds: 

Plant Enlargement 
Building Construction 
Depreciation 
Water: 

Operation 
Bond Proceeds: 
Dow Reservoir 
Construction 1969 
Construction 1970 
Construction 1971 
Construction 1973 



3,121,569.27 

197,260.58 

128,702.97 
2,877.16 

237.04 

145,091.22 

58,395.23 

99,287.76 

516.69 

430.71 

7,196.92 

1,989.56 

57,476.45 



ASSETS 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 

MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET-DECEMBER 31, 1973 

LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



Aid to Highways 
State 
County 



Other Assets : 

Loans Authorized: 
Sewer Construction 
Art 63 TM 3-7-66 
Sewer Treatment Plant 

Art 16 TM 3-1-71 
Water Cleaning & Lining 
Art 19 TM 3-5-73 



21,049.54 
9,750.00 
30,799.54 



343,000.00 

3,500,000.00 

160,000.00 
4,003,000.00 



Unprovided for or Overdrawn Accounts : 



Estimated Receipts 

General 

Water 
Overlay 1966 
Revenue 1972 
Revenue 1973 



Due from Revenue Sharing 



413,281.80 

106,417.72 

26.40 

11.03 

1,910,474.35 

2,430,211.30 

37,287.39 



Operating Balances : (Cont . ) 
Water 

Plant & Investment 
Bond Issue Interest 



Loans Authorized & Unissued 



37.19 
4,050.75 
3,825,119.50 

4,003,000.00 



Receipts Reserved for Appropriations : 
State Aid for Libraries 4,031.25 
Water Pollution Control 3,370.00 
Historical Commission 7.00 

County Dog Refund 1,429.49 

Sewer 63,334.40 

72,172.14 

Overlay Reserved for Abatements : 

Levy of 1967 56.25 

Levy of 1969 110.40 

Levy of 1970 237.72 

Levy of 1971 1,113.11 

Levy of 1972 7,722.05 

Levy of 1973 207,519.84 

216,759.37 



Overlay Surplus 



104,708.43 



Revenue Reserved Until Collected 



Motor Vehicle Excise 

Farm Animal Excise 

Departmental 

Aid to Highways 

Tax Title & Possession 

Electric 

Water 

Sewer 



52,086.52 

77.00 

64,207.15 

30,799.54 

31,258.47 

183,117.03 

36,145.32 

36,741.46 

434,432.49 



Other Reserves : 
Special Tax 
Petty Cash Advanced 



1,706.35 
405.00 
2,111.35 



Anticipation Loans : 
Serial Issue 
Federal PW 



485,000.00 
11,500.00 
496,500.00 



9.591.535.90 



Surplus Revenue : 
General 



165,423.90 
9.591,535.90 



Source: Town Accountant 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 

MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET-DECEMBER 31, 1973 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 



Net Funded or Fixed Debt : 
Inside Debt 
Outside Debt 
Public Service 



797,000.00 
388,000.00 
890,000.00 



Serial Loans : 

Inside Debt Limit: 
General 

Sewer Construction 727,000.00 
Payne School Renovations 30,000.00 
Fire Equipment 40,000.00 

797,000.00 



Outside Debt Limit: 
General 

Sewer Construction 
School Construction 



280,000.00 
108,000.00 
388,000.00 



2.075.000.00 



Public Service: 
Electric 
Water 



405,000.00 
485,000.00 
890,000.00 
2. , 075. 000. 00 



Deferred Revenue Accounts 



Apportioned Sewer Assessments 

Not Due 134,945.04 

Suspended Sewer Assessments 

Not Due 123,014.04 



Apportioned Sewer Revenue Due: 




1974 


12,947.88 


1975 


11,963.33 


1976 


11,642.93 


1977 


10,298.41 


1978 


10,095.05 


1979 


9,620.38 


1980 


8,667.08 


1981 


8,115.29 


1982 


7,946.67 


1983 


6,232.90 


1984 


5,947.89 


1985 


5,476.66 


1986 


5,475.06 


1987 


4,974.34 


1988 


4,758.45 


1989 


4,062.35 


1990 


2,698.54 


1991 


2,484.86 


1992 


1,536.97 



134,945.04 



257,959.08 



Suspended Sewer 



123,014.04 
257.959.08 



Source: Town Accountant 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1973 



Taxes: 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1971 
Levy of 1972 
Levy of 1973 
Levy of 1974 



Personal Property: 
Levy of 1967 
Levy of 1970 
Levy of 1972 
Levy of 1973 



In Lieu of Taxes: 

State Owned Property 

Cranes Beach 

Ipswich Housing Authority 



6,006.47 

86,141.77 

3,537,269.92 

53.63 

3,629,471.79 



18.75 

33.60 

5,019.95 

83,274.24 

88,346.54 



89,019.63 
10,197.31 

99,216.94 



Licenses and Permits: (Con t.) 

Health & Sanitation 

Camp, Cabin, & Motel 10.00 

Milk, Oleo, Ice Cream 20.00 

Sewer Installers 110.00 

Cesspool Pumping 75.00 

Restaurant 18.00 

Cesspool Pit Fee 562.00 

Plumbing 1,391.50 

Gas 709.00 

Rendering 2.00 

Public Works: 

Street Opening 195.00 



State General Fund Distributions: 

Machinery Basis 4,512.27 

School Aid Chapter 69 & 71-235,257.03 
School Aid Chapter 70 670,665.71 
School Aid Chapter 70 



(Adj 1972) 



16,598.61 



927,033.62 



State Agency Fund Distribution; 
Beano Tax 

Local Aid Fund: 
Lottery 

Licenses and Permits: 
Alcoholic Beverages 
All Other 
Selectmen: 

Amusement 

Auto Dealers 

Common Victualler 

Auctioneer 

Fuel 

Unclassified 

Shellfish Permits 

Occupancy Permits 
Town Clerk: 

Clam Permits 
Police: 

License to carry firearms 1 
Building Inspector: 

Building Permits 3 
Health and Sanitation: 

Septic Tank 



1,768.67 



56,516.77 



19,506.00 



411.00 

130.00 

93.00 

4.00 

10.00 

8.00 

4,020.00 

235.00 

5,500.00 



562.00 
054.50 

360.00 





37,986.00 


Fines & Forfeits: 




District Court 


6,270.50 


Anti Trust Actions 


360.05 


Grants & Gifts: 


6,630.55 


Federal: 




NDEATitle III 


2,287.98 


ESEA Title I 74-144-012 


11,632.00 


ESEA Title II Library 


3,467.77 


ESEA Title II Spec Purp Lib 


700.00 


PL Title VIB 


4,493.00 


PL Title VID (Chap 766 Imp) 


1,500.00 


Food Service USDA 


39,969.42 


Revenue Sharing 


413,870.00 


H.U.D.-Open Space Program 


2,414.23 


btorm Disaster OEP 


9,714.96 




490,049.36 


State Reimbursement: 




School Transportation 


122,233.73 


Outside School Transportatn 


1,201.00 


Vocational Education 


5,805.00 


Food Service 


18,944.14 


Building Assistance 


162,597.51 


Education of Deaf & Blind 


168.00 


Tuition & Transportation 


17,471.22 


Conservation Land Purchase 


15,700.00 


Water Pollution Control 


3,370.00 


Water Pollution Control-Pi 


12,011.20 


Highways Ch 1140 Sec 20 


50,844.00 


Library Aid 


4,031.25 


Marine Fisheries 


1,500.00 


Decennial Census Cost 


2,797.00 



County Dog Fund 

Individuals & Others: 
Chamber of Commerce 
Feoffees of Grammar School 

Ipswich Fairways Inc. 



418,674.05 
1,429.49 



1,111.00 
7,500.00 

10,000.00 
18,611.00 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1973 



Special Assessments: 
Sewer: 

Unapportioned 17,273.32 

Added to Taxes 

Levy of 1972 261.13 

Levy of 1973 13,464.49 

Apportioned Paid in Ad van ce6, 2 78. 57 

37,277.51 



Privileges: 

Motor Vehicle Excise: 
Levy of 1966 
Levy of 1967 
Levy of 1969 
Levy of 1970 
Levy of 1971 
Levy of 1972 
Levy of 1973 



Farm Animal 
Levy of 1973 



52.80 

97.85 

14.03 

187.29 

893.45 

135,243.71 

272,387.21 

408,876.34 



283.80 



Departmental: 






General Government: 






Selectmen 






Liquor I D 




120.00 


Accountant 






Group Insurance 




1,727.69 


Treasurer 






Costs-Taxes 




278.00 


Costs -Mo tor Vehic 


le Ex 


2,124.00 


Tax Certificates 




1,472.00 


Town Clerk 






Recordings 




731.50 


Marriage Intentions 


330.00 


Certified Copies 




550.25 


All Other 




325.50 


Historiaal Commission 


7.00 


Planning Board 






Subdivision Inspection 


32.00 


Rules & Regulations 


17.50 


Filing Fees 




30.00 


Board of Appeals 






Hearing Fees 




432.00 


Conservation 






Filing & Hearing 


Fees 


125.00 



Public Safety: 
Police: 

Photo Copies 
Bicycle Registration 
Firearms Identification 



8,302.44 



437.00 

40.50 

202.00 



Departmental: (Cont.) 
Public Safety 
Forestry 

Line Clearing 
Sealer of Weights 



Health & Sanitation 
Rabies Clinic 
Immunizations 
Sewer Construction- 
Housing Authority 
Sewer Rentals 
Recycling 

Sewer-Connection Fees 
Rental Liens: 
Levy of 1972 
Levy of 1973 



Highway: 
General 
Machinery 
Sidewalk 

Concrete Anti Trust Case 
Chapter 90-State 



Veterans Services: 

Reimbursement for Relief 
Recovery 



Schools: 
Tuition 

Drivers Education 
Lost Textbooks 
Rent of Facilities 
Food Service 
Athletic 

Transportation-County 
Pay Telephone 
Sale of Surplus Equipment 



Recreation: 
Swim Program 
Beach Stickers 
Lighthouse Use 



4,523.60 
109.90 





5,313. 


00 




378. 


00 






18. 


50 




45, 


,000. 


00 




24, 


,567. 


83 






642. 


67 






380. 


00 






257. 


,61 




1 


,235. 


,74 






72,480. 


35 


1 


,772. 


,48 






25. 


,00 






20. 


,00 






6. 


.60 




1 


,450. 


.46 






3,274. 


54 


39 


,578, 


.21 






184, 


.00 






39,; 


762. 


21 


1 


,870, 


.00 






900, 


.00 






53, 


.00 






15, 


.00 




155 


,336, 


.79 




10 


,289, 


.93 




1 


,138, 


.16 






208, 


.44 




3 


,020, 


.00 






172,831. 


32 




463 


.00 




2 


,263 


.00 






507 


.50 





3,233.50 



Unclassified: 

Rental of Municipal Property 5,168.66 
Sale of Town Property 216.83 






DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1973 



Departmental: (Cont.) 
Unclassified: 

Fire Loss Insurance 
Other Insurance 



Public Service Enterprises: 
Electric: 

Rates & Services 
Aid to Construction 
Water: 

Rates & Services 
Liens: 

Levy of 1972 
Levy of 1973 



Cemeteries: 
Sale of Lots 
Care of Lots (Annual) 
Openings 
Foundations 
Tents 
Liners 



Interest On: 
Deposits 

Meter 

Depreciation 

Conservation 
Taxes & Assessments: 

Taxes 

Assessments -Sewer 
Levy of 1972 
Levy of 1973 
Apportioned Paid in Adv 
Motor Vehicle 
Investments: 

General 

Revenue Sharing 

Electric Temporary Loan 

Stabilization 
Trust Funds 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 

Cemetery Flower 

Mrs Wm G Brown 

Marianna Jones 

R T Crane Picnic 

Eunice C Cowles 

Mark Newman 

Martha Savory 

Dow Boulder 

Appleton Memorial 

John C Kimball 



21,996.00 
575.75 
27,957.24 



1,391,407.92 
720.66 



186,333.87 

1,589.28 
10,375.72 
1,590,427.45 



1,750.00 

565.50 
5,340.00 
1,016.10 

660.00 

520.00 
9,851.60 



3,098.62 
1,299.29 
1,884.93 

6,479.81 

301.75 

6,958.51 

82.10 

1,099.84 

14,468.25 

11,202.61 

1,371.34 

12,011.95 

6,514.27 

354.05 

181.88 

125.94 

1,187.88 

671.10 

505.90 

51.61 

16.21 

68.10 

25.18 
69,961.12 



Municipal Indebtedness: 

Anticipation of Revenue Ln 1,500,000.00 
Anticipation-Serial Issue: 



Water 

Electric 

Sewer 
Serial Loans: 

Electric Building 

Sewer Extension 

Water Pump 
Premium 



225,000.00 
100,000.00 
160,000.00 

175,000.00 
160,000.00 

65,000.00 
565.15 

2,385,565.15 



Agency, Trust and Investments: 
Agency: 

Dog Licenses 

Sale of Dogs 

Meter Deposit 

Health Insurance Deductions 

Health Insurance Paid In 

Health Insurance Consortium 

O.M.E. Deductions 

O.M.E. Paid In 

Life Insurance Deductions 

Life Insurance Paid In 

Life Insurance Consortium 

Tax Sheltered Annuities Ded 

Clothing Allowance Deduction 



Advances 

Revolving: 
Police 
General 



Payroll 
Workmens Comp 



2,489.25 

54.00 

6,585.00 

63,314.91 

4,287.82 

1,792.04 

595.06 

1,108.80 

1,826.74 

105.59 

40.15 

20,527.35 

1,862.63 

2,230.11 

112.00 

13,878.00 
30.00 
120,839.45 



Trust: 

Perpetual Care Bequests 5,270.00 
Flower Fund Bequests 400.00 

Eunice C Cowles Scholarship 500.00 
Richard T Crane Picnic Reimb 1,182.40 
Mrs. Wm G Brown Reimb Exp 3,654. 31 

11,006.71 



Investments: 
Revenue Cash 
Non-Revenue 
Federal Revenue Sharing 



Refunds: 

General Government 
Public Safety 
Health & Sanitation 
Highways 



1,000 


,000, 


.00 




48 


,000. 


.00 




869 


,719. 


.00 




1, 


917,; 


719. 


00 




319. 


,33 






549. 


,14 






60. 


00 






276. 


52 





DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1973 



Refunds: (Cont.) 
Veterans Benefits 
Schools 
Libraries 
Recreation 
Retirement -Teachers 
Insurance 
Interest on Debt 
Interest Tax Anticipation 
Unclassified-Union 
Electric 

Purchased Power 

Other 
Accrued Interest 
R. T. Crane Picnic 



1,032.20 

2,522.91 

246.35 

664.62 

247.50 

37,914.10 

487.50 

698.76 

60.00 

59,742.52 

2,286.13 

106.67 

1,061.43 

108,175.68 

12.768.873.19 



Source: Town Accountant 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF PAYMENTS 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1973 



Departmental Expenditures: 
Appropriation 
Revenue Sharing 



Public Service Enterprises 
Electric: 
Operation 

Building Construction 
Depreciation 



Water: 

Operation 

Main Construction 1973 

1971 
1970 

Plant & Investment 



5,179,705.16 
403,680.04 
5,583,385.20 



1,156,350.01 
29,908.78 
69,596.26 
1,255,855.05 



107,672.09 

7,523.55 

11,323.98 

3,346.34 

2,698.25 

132,564.21 



Agency: 

Veterans District 
County Dog Licenses Coll. 
Bid & Performance Bond 
Union Dues 
Payroll Advances 
Health Insurance: 

Deductions 

Retiree 

Consortium 
Medex Deductions 
0ME 
Life Insurance 

Deductions 

Retirees 

Consortium 
Tax Sheltered Annuities 
Clothing Allowance Deduction 



12,108.36 

2,467.50 

500.00 

60.00 

2,383.82 

61,099.65 

4,170.90 

1,912.69 

517.44 

1,003.20 

1,769.35 

102.90 

43.45 

20,518.91 

1,691.97 

110,350.14 



Municipal Indebtedness: 

Maturing Debt: 

General 294,000.00 

Public Service Enterprisel21,000.00 

Interest on Maturing Debt: 

General 59,270.75 

Public ServiceEnterprise 26,820.50 

Temporary Loans - 

Anticipation Revenue 1,500,000.00 

Interest-Anticipation Lns 31,522.51 

2,032,613.76 



Trust: 

Cemetery: 



State £c County Assessments: 
State Recreation Areas 
Metropolitan Air Pollution 
Metropolitan Area Planning 
Shellfish Purification 
Mosquito Control 
Ipswich River Watershed 
Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 
State Assessment System 
County Tax 



32,225.64 

386.96 

537.50 

3,855.07 

13,755.60 

293.83 

1,058.10 

447.52 

108,029.62 



160,589.84 



Perpetual Care Bequests 




5,115.00 


Income 




6,514.27 


Flower Fund -Bequest 




400.00 


Income 




354.05 


Conservation Fund 




10,308.29 


Other Funds: 






John C. Kimball 




25.18 


Mrs. Wm G Brown -Income 




181.88 


Dog Pound 


3,654.31 


Marianna Jones 




125.94 


R T Crane Picnic -Income 




2,249.31 


Picnic 


Exp 


1,182.40 


Eunice C Cowles-Income 




671.10 


Scholars 


ihip 


500.00 


Mark Newman 




505.90 


Martha Savory 




51.61 


Dow Boulder 




16.21 


Appleton Memorial 




68.10 
31,923.55 


Investment: 






Certificate of Deposit: 






Revenue 


1,1 


300,000.00 


Federal Revenue Sharing 


1 


332,079.00 


Stabilization 




12,011.95 



1,844,090.95 



10 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF PAYMENTS 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1973 



Refunds: 

Taxes 14,882.62 

Sewer Assessments 13.50 

Motor Vehicle Excise 11,900.08 
Electric Accounts Receivable 125.40 
Water Accounts Receivable 

Liens 
Sewer Liens 
Committed Interest 
Meter Deposits 
Meter Deposit Income 
Health Insurance 
Teacher Retirement 

Total Payments 





453, 


.67 






601, 


.89 






59, 


.57 






47, 


.09 




2 


,082, 


.00 






122, 


.62 






247, 


.20 






285, 


.03 






30,820. 


67 


U, 


182.: 


L93. 


37 



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19 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1973 



MODERATOR 



PLANNING BOARD (Cont.) 



Available: 

Appropriation 

Expenditures: 
Salaries 
To 1974 



Available: 

Appropriation 



SELECTMEN 



Expenditures: 
Salaries 
Admin is tr at ion 
Departmental S & S 
Capital Outlay-Typewriter 



To 1974 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



Available: 

Appropriation 

Expenditures: 
Salaries 
Administration 

To 1974 

RESERVE FUND 
Available: 

Appropriation 

Transfers: 
Harbors 

Dump Maintenance 
Treasurer 
Health Insurance 
Police 

Building Inspector 
Health Bldg. 
Fire Building 
Fire 



To 1974 



PLANNING BOARD 



Available: 

Appropriation 

Expenditures: 
Salaries 
Adminis trat ion 
Capital Outlay-File Cabinet 



190.00 
190.00 

100.00 

90.00 

190.00 



15,884.00 
15,884.00 



6,114.03 

2,104.91 

899.00 

532.50 

9,650.44 

6,233.56 

15,884.00 



2,300.00 
2,300.00 



135.81 
1,105.74 
1,241.55 
1,058.45 
2,300.00 



66,869.00 
66,869.00 



400.00 

2,500.00 

300.00 

9,000.00 

1,581.52 

130.00 

767.46 

1,634.60 

500.00 

16,813.58 

50,055.42 

66,869.00 



7,915.00 
7,915.00 

531.25 

3,846.54 

75.00 

4,452.79 



Expenditures: 






To 1974 




3,462.21 
7,915.00 


ELECTION & RE :STRAT 


Available: 






Appropriation 




13,265.00 
13,265.00 


Expenditures: 






Salaries 




4,074.36 


Administration 




2,047.10 
6,121.46 


To 1974 




7,143.54 
13,265.00 


APPEALS 


BOARD 




Available: 






Appropriation 




650.00 
650.00 


Expenditures: 






Salaries 




175.00 


Administration 




165.58 


Capital Outlay-Fil< 


3 Cabinet 


56.00 
396.58 


To 1974 




253.42 
650.00 


TOWN MANAGER 




Available: 






Appropriation 




77,661.00 
77,661.00 


Expenditures: 






Salaries 




33,842.32 


Administration 




7,744.36 


Town Report 




4,276.40 


Special Items 




38.00 


Capital Outlay 






Vehicle 




3,183.00 


Adding Machine 




152.55 
49,236.63 


To 1974 




28,424.37 
77,661.00 


INSURANi E 




Available: 






Appropriation 




103,400.00 
103,400.00 


Expenditures: 






Package 




35,646.84 


Officials Bond 




565.00 


Workmen ' s Comp . 




17,743.00 
53,954.84 


To 1974 




49,445.16 
103,400.00 


EMPLOYEES 


BENEFITS 


i 


Available: 






Appropriation 




352,195.00 


Reserve Fund 




9,000.00 



361,195.00 



20 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1973 



EMPLOYEES 


BENEFITS 


(Cont.) 


TOWN CLERK 




Expenditures: 






Available: 




Retirement 




242,195.00 


Appropriation 


20,212.00 


Health Insurance 




63,351.10 




20,212.00 


Military Credits 




9,306.30 


Expenditures: 








314,852.40 


Salaries & Wages 


12,568.29 


To 1974 




46,342.60 
361,195.00 


Adminis tr at ion 


777.76 
13,346.05 


DEBT SERVICE 




To 1974 


6,865.95 


Available: 






LEGAL 


20,212.00 


Appropriation 




441,590.00 


Available: 








441,590.00 


Appropriation 


17,158.00 


Expenditures: 








17,158.00 


Debt Principal 




294,000.00 


Expenditures: 




Debt Interest 




59,270.75 


Salaries & Wages 


9,382.42 


Anticipation Interest 


30,823.75 


Administration 


140.00 






384,094.50 




9,522.42 


To 1974 




57,495.50 
441,590.00 


To 1974 


7,635.58 
17,158.00 


ACCOUNTIN 




INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 


Available: 






Available: 




Appropriation 




49,866.00 
49,866.00 


Appropriation 


1,350.00 
1,350.00 


Expenditures: 






Expenditures: 




Salaries & Wages 




25,842.99 


Salaries & Wages 


50.00 


Administration 




5,795.43 
31,638.42 


Administration 
Capital Outlay 


8.37 


To 1974 




18,227.58 


File Cabinet 


56.00 






49,866.00 


Typewriter 


69.00 


TREASURER- 


■COLLECTOR 




183.37 


Available: 






To 1974 


1,166.63 


Appropriation 




51,240.00 




1,350.00 


Reserve Fund 




300.00 


HISTORICAL COMMISS 






51,540.00 


Available: 




Expenditures: 






Appropriation 


450.00 


Salaries & Wages 




29,909.24 




450.00 


Administration 




2,847.21 


Expenditures: 




Capital Outlay 






Administration 


11.15 


Typewriter 




603.00 


Departmental S & S 


10.00 


Adding Machine 




224.55 




21.15 






33,584.00 


To 1974 


428.85 


To 1974 




17,956.00 




450.00 






51,540.00 


CONSERVATION COMMISS IOi 


ASSESS 




Available: 




Available: 






Appropriation 


6,930.00 


Appropriation 




42,359.00 
42,359.00 


Expenditures: 


6,930.00 


Expenditures: 






Salaries & Wages 


498.13 


Salaries & Wages 




23,252.65 


Administration 


541.32 


Adminis tration 




2,410.07 


Capital Outlay 




Capital Outlay 






Appraisal 


3,191.00 


Calculator 




635.92 




4,230.45 






26,298.64 


To 1974 


2,699.55 


To 1974 




16,060.36 




6,930.00 



42,359.00 



21 



DETAILED STATEMENT OP EXPENDITURES 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1973 



HISTORICAL DISTRICT 


FIRE (Cont.) 




Available: 




Expenditures: 




Appropriation 


340.00 


Fire Alarm Ext. 


1,905.86 




340.00 


Filing Cabinet 


91.20 


Expenditures: 






214,387.34 


To 1974 


340.00 


To 1974 


113,304.66 




340.00 




327,692.00 


YOUTH COMMISSION 




CIVIL DEFENSE 




Available: 




Available: 




Appropriation 


28,890.00 


Appropriation 


4,775.00 




28,890.00 




4,775.00 


Expenditures: 




Expenditures: 




Salaries & Wages 


8,451.00 


Salaries & Wages 


1,364.88 


Administration 


2,652.10 


Administration 


565.64 


Physical Plant 


4,811.05 


Departmental S & S 


244.28 




15,914.15 


Equipment 


115.78 




12,975.85 


Capital Outlay 






28,890.00 


Power Amplifier 


300.00 


POLICE 




Aux. Police Equip. 


520.30 


Available: 






3,110.88 


Appropriation 


338,039.00 


To 1974 


1,664.12 


Reserve Fund 


1,581.52 
339,620.52 




4,775.00 


Expenditures: 




SHELLFISH 




Salaries & Wages 


224,766.40 


Available: 




Administration 


7,463.09 


Appropriation 


26,102.00 


Departmental S & S 


2,533.10 




26,102.00 


Special Items 




Expenditures: 




Out of State 


150.00 


Salaries & Wages 


9,894.00 


Capital Outlay 




Administration 


705.35 


Cruisers 


8,958.24 


Departmental S & S 


732.84 


Revo lvers 


131.56 




11,332.19 


File Cabinets 


100.00 


HARBORS 




Photo Equipment 


700.00 


Available: 






244,802.39 


Appropriation 


3,800.00 


To 1974 


94,818.13 


Reserve Fund 


400.00 




339,620.52 




4,200.00 


FIRE 




Expenditures: 




Available: 




Salaries & Wages 


1,999.98 


Appropriation 


327,192.00 


Administration 


997.84 


Reserve Fund 


500.00 




2,997.82 




327,692.00 


To 1974 


1,202.18 


Expenditures: 






4,200.00 


Salaries & Wages 


199,828.20 


HEALTH 




Administration 


3,363.71 


Available: 




Departmental S & S 


843.85 


Appropriation 


39,495.00 


Equipment 


3,936.02 


Reserve Fund 


767.46 


Special Items 






40,262.46 


Out of State 


100.00 


Expenditures: 




Capital Outlay 




Salaries & Wages 


14,636.02 


Chief Car 


3,120.50 


Administration 


1,121.92 


New Hose 


998.00 


Departmental S & S 


9,245.79 


Beds 


200.00 


Capital Outlay 








Recycling Building 


755.72 
25,759.45 



22 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1973 



Expenditures: 
To 1974 



HEALTH (Cont.) 



14,503, 
40,262, 



01 
46 



HEALTH CONTRACTS 



Available: 

Appropriation 
Reserve Fund 

Expenditures: 

Rubbish Collection 
Garbage Collection 
Dump Maintenance 



176,000.00 

2.500.00 

178,500.00 



To 1974 



VETERANS SERVICES 



49,208, 
24,8112, 
30,741, 

104,762, 
73,737 

178,500 



29 
49 
44 
22 

00 



Available: 




Appropriation 


216,750.00 




216,750.00 


Expenditures: 


- 


Cash Allowance 


51,524.28 


Medical 


45,420.45 


Groceries 


5,166.14 


Fuel 


3,060.20 


Burial 


820.70 




105,991.77 


To 1974 


110,758.23 




216,750.00 


PUBLIC WORKS 


ADMINISTRATION 


Available: 




Appropriation 


22,106.00 



Expenditures: 

Salaries & Wages 
Administration 

To 1974 



22,106.00 



12,529 
1,888 



.98 
.58 



14,418 
7,687 



.56 

.44 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 



Available: 

Appropriation 
Reserve Fund 

Expenditures: 

Salaries & Wages 
Administration 
Capital Outlay 
File Cabinet 

To 1974 



TOWN HALL 



Available: 

Appropriation 



22,106.00 



12,165.00 

130.00 

12,295.00 

4,602.46 
1,112.12 

75.00 

5,789.58 

6,505.42 

12,295.00 



25,269.00 
25,269.00 



TOWN 


HALL (Cont.) 


Expenditures: 






Salaries & Wages 




6,890.40 


Physical Plant 




6,308.54 
13,198.94 


To 1974 




12,070.06 
25,269.00 


MEMORIAL 


BUILDING 




Available: 






Appropriation 




3,765.00 
3,765.00 


Expenditures: 






Physical Plant 




1,324.04 
1,324.04 


To 1974 




2,440.96 
3,765.00 


SEWAGE 


BUILDING 




Aval. laDie : 

Appropriation 




760.00 
760.00 


Expenditures: 






Physical Plant 




477.94 
477.94 


To 1974 




282.06 
760.00 


FIRE BUILDIN 




Available: 






Appropriation 




21,300.00 


Reserve Fund 




1,248.60 
22,548.60 


Expenditures: 






Physical Plant 




2,505.61 


Capital Outlay 






Floor Repairs 




15,886.00 
18,391.61 


To 1974 




4,156.99 
22,548.60 


TOWN 


GARAGE 




Available: 






Appropriation 




4,710.00 
4,710.00 



Expenditures: 
Physical Plant 
Capital Outlay 
Overhead Door 



To 1974 



CEMETERY BUILDING 



Available: 

Appropriation 

Expenditures: 
Physical Plant 
Capital Outlay 
Plumbing 



23 



2,116.74 

750.00 
2,866.74 
1,843.26 
4,710.00 



1,100.00 
1,100.00 

283.58 

369.00 
652.58 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1973 



CEMETERY BUILDING (Cont. ) 
To 1974 447.42 

1,100.00 



PARK BUILDING 



Available: 

Appropriation 

Expenditures: 
Physical Plant 
Building Rent 

To 1974 



LIBRARY BUILDING 



Available: 

Appropriation 

Expenditures: 
Physical Plant 
Capital Outlay 
Oil Burner 



5,000.00 
5,000.00 

885.62 
2,255.43 
3,141.05 
1,858.95 
5,000.00 



4,055.00 
4,055.00 

2,128.48 



390.00 





2,518.48 


To 1974 


1,536.52 




4,055.00 


HIGHWAY 




Available: 




Appropriation 


2,619.20 




2,619.20 


Expenditures: 




Salaries & Wages 


72,751.24 


Administration 


1,020.34 


Physical Plant 


45,392.13 


Departmental S & S 


33,590.31 


Equipment 


27,360.00 


Capital Outlay 




Sidewalk Tractor 


7,978.00 


Drainage -Charlotte 


3,061.52 




191,153.54 


To 1974 


70,766.46 




261,920.00 


EQUIPMENT MAINTENAN( E 


Available: 




Appropriation 


82*990.00 




82,990.00 


Expenditures: 




Salaries & Wages 


17,395.02 


Adminis tr at ion 


398.53 


Departmental S & S 


614.18 


Equipment 


32,585.98 


Capital Outlay 




Air Compressor 


900.00 




51,893.71 


To 1974 


31,096.29 



SNOW & ICE CONTROL 



Available: 

Appropriation 

Expenditures: 

Salaries & Wages 
Administration 
Departmental S & S 
Equipment Rental 

To 1974 



FORESTRY 



Available: 

Appropriation 



Expenditures: 

Salaries & Wages 
Administration 
Departmental S & S 
Equipment 
Special Item 

Dune Restoration 
Capital Outlay 

Saw 

Sky Worker 



To 1974 



78,500.00 
78,500.00 

3,658.44 

132.00 

10,489.64 

1,308.50 
15,588.58 
62,911.42 
78,500.00 



92,892.00 
92,892.00 

37,941.01 

800.15 

7,859.14 

3,661.43 

743.93 

593.85 

6,126.00 

57,725.51 

35,166.49 

92,892.00 



RECREATION & PARKS 



Available: 

Appropriation 

Expenditures: 

Salaries & Wages 
Administration 
Physical Plant 
Departmental S & S 
Equipment 
Special Items 

Out of State 
Capital Outlay 

Tractor 

Playground Equipment 

Hot top Linebrook 

Neck Causeway 

Bleachers 



To 1974 

Available: 

Appropriation 



CEMETERY 



101,441.00 
101,441.00 

53,680.05 

1,685.10 

1,518.90 

9,917.39 

750.00 

111.80 

3,560.00 

1,055.30 

435.00 

500.00 

835.00 

74,048.54 

27,392.46 

101,441.00 

87,814.00 
87,814.00 



82,990.00 



24 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1973 



CEMETERY (Cont 


•) 


SEWER OPERATING 




Expenditures: 




Available: 






Salaries & Wages 


47,145.45 


Appropriation 




43,585.00 


Administration 


1,010.25 






43,585.00 


Physical Plant 


2,833.68 


Expenditures: 






Departmental S & S 


444.25 


Salaries & Wages 




18,630.40 


Equipment 


1,813.11 


Administration 




1,000.39 


Capital Outlay 




Physical Plant 




35.00 


Tractor 


975.00 


Departmental S & S 




2,796.31 




54,221.74 


Equipment 




5,520.95 


To 1974 


33,592.26 






27,983.05 




87,814.00 


To 1974 




15,601.95 


EDUCATION 








43,585.00 


Available: 




SPECIAL ARTICLES 


/ CAPITA! 


Appropriation 


4,371,454.00 


Available: 






Court Decree 


70,598.51 


Balance 




279,638.79 




4,420,052.51 


Appropriation 




561,673.30 


Expenditures: 




Recap Tax Rate 




5,000.00 


Administration- 1000 




Water Pollution Control 


12,011.20 


Salaries & Wages 


58,243.90 


Bond Issue 




160,000.00 


Expenditures 


9,185.69 


Housing Authority 




45,000.00 


Instruction-2000 






1 


,063,323.29 


Salaries & Wages 


1,988,700.82 


Expenditures: 






Expenditures 


143,400.86 


Tax Title Foreclosure 


70.86 


Other School Services-3000 


Comprehensive Plan 




241.83 


Salaries & Wages 


55,339.48 


Whittier Regional 




308,543.00 


Expenditures 


240,627.10 


Town Hall Imp. 




137.90 


Athletics-3510 




Ipswich Promotion 




700.00 


Salaries & Expenditures 34,609.21 


Unpaid Bills 




7,889.30 


Oper. & Maint.-4000 




Chapter 90 Maint. 




142.34 


Salaries & Wages 


133,671.00 


North Main St. Sewer 


3,677.25 


Expenditures 


109,671.45 


Sewer Construction 


1971 


10,362.36 


Fixed Charges -5000 


12,751.00 


Sewer Construction 


1972 


12,942.42 


Acquis, of Fixed Assets- 


7000 29,093.22 


Sewer Construction 


1973 


84,668.60 


Other Districts-9000 


4,200.64 


Sewer Construction 


1973 


13,029.74 




2,819,494.37 


Payne School Renovation 


2,256.80 


To 1974 


1,622,558.14 


Ladder Truck 




71,227.67 




4,442,052.51 


School Building Needs 


75.50 


LIBRARY 








515,965.57 


Available: 




To 1974 




547,357.72 


Appropriation 


102,443.00 
102,443.00 




1 


,063,323.29 


Expenditures 




ENCUMBRANCE 




Salaries & Wages 


47,357.24 


Available: 






Administration 


1,443.64 


Balance 




59,400.47 


Departmental S & S 


17,096.81 


Refund 




223.14 


Special Item 




Recap Tax Rate 




8,097.38 


Out of State 


16.80 






67,720.99 


Capital Outlay 




Expenditures: 






Shelving 


803.25 


Sub Division Insp. 




192.00 




66,717.74 


P. C. D. 




215.87 


To 1974 


35,725.26 


Comprehensive Plan 




4,809.15 




102,443.00 


Elections 




604.50 



25 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1973 



ENCUMBRANCES (Cont.) 



Manager 


86.07 


Accounting 


97.05 


Police 


162.75 


Veterans Services 


18,216.68 


Snow Removal 


43.84 


Cemetery 


6.34 


Education 


13,030.59 


Sewer Operation 


142.88 


Fire 


168.00 


Civil Defense 


1,296.45 


Health 


140.00 


Recreation 


154.00 


Industrial Commission 


11.00 




39,377.17 


To 1974 


28,343.82 




67,720.99 



Source: Town Accountant 



26 



FEOFFEES OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL 

IPSWICH, MASS. 01938 

WILLIAM F. HAYES HARRY E - MUNR0 

JEROME RICHARDSON DONALD F. WHISTON 

Financial Statement 1973 

Balance January 1, 1973 $ 4,415.66 

Cash received 1973 92,366.08 

96,781.74 
Expenditures 1973 95.234.96 

Balance December 31, 1973 1,546.78 

Little Week (Land only) valued at $97,500.00 

Store Building 4,600.00 

Bam 1,090.00 

Wharf 1,019.00 

Cash in First Nat'l Bank Ipswich 1,546.78 

On deposit Ipswich Savings Bank 2,858.50 



Interest 233.87 

On deposit Ipswich Savings Bank 

Farm account 5,144.97 

Interest 235.60 

On deposit Ipswich Savings Bank 

Special Notice account 3,084.64 

Interest 179.06 

On deposit Ipswich Co-op. Bank 6,177.01 

Interest and Dividends 448.98 

Cost Value 



3,092.37 
5,380.57 

3,263.70 
6,625.99 



234 Sh. 1st Nat'l Bost. Corp. 2,748.18 9,564.75 
140 Sh. Shawm. Ass'n. Corp. 2,748.63 5,250.00 
Ipswich Co-op Paid-up Cert. 2,000.00 2,000.00 16 81Z , „,- 

$140,933.16 
$7,500.00 was given to the Town for support of schools. 
The following taxes were paid to the Town of Ipswich: 

$ 5,362.50 
253.00 

59.95 
56.04 

59,649.70 
65,381.19 



27 Tr^ag'urer/Kanager 



Land 


As 


sessed 


Value 


97,500.00 


Store 




11 


n 


4,600.00 


Barn 




ft 


tt 


1,090.00 


Wharf 




It 


ft 


1,019.00 


Cottages 




n 


it 


1,084,540.00 




1,188,749.00 




TRUSTEES OF RUNNING SCHOOL FUNDS 
DONALD F. WHISTON AND DAVID C. WILLIAMS, SR 



January 1, 19 73 



MANNING SCHOOL FUNDS 



Balance in Account #14293, 
Balance in Account # 7884, 
Balance in Account # 1995, 



Ipswich Savings Bank 
Ipswich Savings Bank 
Ipswich Co-op Hank 



Income from Interest and Dividends: 



$50,769.53 

25,190.30 

6 t 138.29 

$82,098.12 

5,304.83 

$87,402.95 



Less Disbursements: 



Rental of Safe Deposit Box 
Supplies for Ipswich High School 



$ 5.00 
$1323.00 



l t 328.00 
$86,074.95 



ASSETS IN FUNDS 



December 31, 1973 

Balance in Account #14293, Ipswich Savings Bank 

Balance in Account # 7884, Ipswich Savings Bank 

Balance in Account # 1995, Ipswich Co-op Bank 



$50,769.53 
25,190,30 
10.115.12 

$86,074.95 



SECURITIES AT BOOK VALUE 



138 Shares, First National Bank of Boston $2,998.20 
20 Shares, Ipswich Cooperative Bank 4.000.00 



6.998.20 
$93,073.15 



David C. Williams, Treasurer 



28 



BURLEY EDUCATION FUND 



BALANCE ON HAND JANUARY 1, 1973: 



$12,548.27 



INCOME FROM FUNDS FOR YEAR 1972 AS FOLLOWS: 

Interest - Salem Savings Bank 

Interest - Salem Five Cents Savings Bank 

Interest - Ipswich Savings Bank 

Interest - Ipswich Savings Bank (Caldwell Fund) 

Dividend - Ipswich Co-operative Bank 

Total Income 



,$ 122.76 

118.81 

211.64 

124.42 

55.14 



632.77 



13,181.04 



EXPENDITURES: 



Equipment 

Safe Deposit Box Rent 

Total Expense 



1,983.00 
5.00 



1,988.00 



$11,193.04 



BALANCE ON HAND JANUARY 1, 1973 AS FOLLOWS: 

Deposited in Salem Savings Bank 

Deposited in Salem Five Cents Savings Bank 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank (Caldwell Fund) 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank 

Ipswich Co-operative Bank - Paid Up Certificate 

Total Invested Funds 



2,400.98 
2,138.53 
4,134.23 
1,519.30 
1,000.00 



$11,193.04 



Respectfully submitted, 
BURLEY EDUCATION FUND 

Wilmot E. Hall, Treasurer 



29 



BURLEY EDUCATION FUND 

BALANCE ON HAND JANUARY 1, 1973; $11,193.04 

INCOME FROM FUNDS FOR YEAR 1973 AS FOLLOWS: 

Interest - Salem Savings Bank $ 131.23 

Interest - Salem Five Cents Savings Bank 106.94 

Interest - Ipswich Savings Bank 318.51 

Interest - Ipswich Savings Bank (Caldwell Fund) 83.55 

Dividend - Ipswich Co-operative Bank 55. 75 695.98 

Total Income 11,889.02 



EXPENDITURES: 

Safe Deposit Box Rent 5-00 5.QQ 

Total Expense $11,884.02 



BALANCE ON HAND JANUARY 1, 1974 AS FOLLOWS: 

Deposited in Salem Savings Bank 2,532.21 

Deposited in Salem Five Cents Savings Bank 2,245*47 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank (Caldwell Fund) 4, 452.74 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank 1, 653.60 

Ipswich Co-operative Bank - Paid Up Certificate 1 , 000 . 00 



Total Invested Funds $11,884.02 

Respectfully submitted, 
BURLEY EDUCATION FUND 

v I Si hliii 

Wilmot E. Hall, Treasurer 



30 



BROWN SCHOOL FUND 



Treasurer's Report 12th January 197lj. 

Balance 29th December 1972 3761|.l6 

Salem Five Cents Savings Bank 

Interest thru 31st December 1973 205*79 3969.95 

Balance 29th December 1972 2690. 89 

Ipswich Savings Bank 

Interest thru 31st December 1973 Ik5*k9 2836.38 



Total Balance 31st December 1973 3969.95 

2836.38 68O6.33 



J. Perry Smith 
Treasurer 

Certified: 

Charlotte E. Terry 
12th January 197^ 



31 



IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBPAPY 



Trust Funds - 1973 

T re a dwell 
Heard 
Lathrop 
Spiller 
Newman 
Building 
Memorial Book 
Wa les Endowment 

Total 1973 
Total 1972 
Increase (Decrease) 



Book 


Market 


Lower of 


1973 


Value 


Value 


Cost or Market 


Income 


$23,177 


$38,895 


$20,130 


$1,503 


10,0^8 


17,287 


8,712 


736 


1,6^5 


1,855 


1,855 


102 


1,812 


1,557 


1,557 


87 


5,603 


5,395 


5,395 


276 


2U,U73 


2h,007 


2U,007 


l,27li 


920 


920 


920 


k6 


285 


285 


285 


15 


$68,183 


$90,201 


$62,861 


$U,039 


62,768 


98,6h6 


59,239 


3,762 


$ 5,U15 


$(8,UU5) 


$ 3,622 


$ 277 



Operating Statement - 1973 
Income 

Town Appropriation 

Books Lost or Sold 

Donations 

Fines 

Photocopy 

State & Federal 

Trust Funds 

Less: Transfer to Funds 



Memorial Book Donation 
Harris Bequeath 
Newman & Wales Income 



$69,339 




358 




5,228 




1,090 




875 




U98 




U,039 


$81,U27 


125 




5,000 




290 


5,hl5 



Net Income - available for Operations 



$76,012 



Expenditures 

Salaries & Wages 

Telephone 

Postage 

Dues & Meetings 

Office Equipment 

Consultant 

Supplies 

Books 

Periodicals 

Records 

Equipment 

Financial Service 

Expense Total 

Surplus 



Library 


Town 


Funds 


Funds 




$U7,599 




672 




250 


$ 36 


326 




292 


572 


- 


5 


1,692 


59 


16,928 


(ID 


6U9 


3 


89 


862 


8U2 


178 


— 



$1,70U 



$69,339 



Total 

$U7,599 

672 

250 

362 

292 

572 

1,697 

16,987 

638 

92 

l,70h 

178 



$71,OU3 



7LOU3 
$ h, 969 



DWPrarg 2-15-7U 



32 



D. W. POOR, Jr. 
Treasurer 



ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPARTMENT 



BALANCE SHEET 



DECEMBER 31, 1973 



ASSETS 



LIABILITIES & SURPLUS 



Current Assets: 
Cash: 

Depreciation 
Construction 
Plant-Art .10, ATM 1969 
Operations 
Special Deposits 
Plant-Art/ 23 ATM 1973 

Accounts Receivable 
Working Funds 
Inventory: 

Fuel Oil 

Lubricants 

Materials & Supplies 

Total Current Assets 

Fixed Assets: 

Land & Land Rights 

Power Structures 

Fuel Holders 

Prime Movers 

Generators 

Accessory Elec. Equip. 

Misc. Power Plant " 

Land & Land Rights 

Land Clearing 

Trans. -Poles & Fixt. 

Trans. -Overhead Cond. 

Distrib.-Sta. Equip. 

Poles & Fixtures 

Overhead Conductors 

Underground Conduits 

Underground Conductors 

Line Trans. & Regul. 

Services 

Meters 

Meter Installations 

Street Lighting 

Outdoor Private Light. 

General Structures 
Equipment : 

Office 

Transportation 

Shop 

Laboratory 

Communication 
Total Fixed Assets 
Less Reserve for Den re c 



Total Assets 



57,987.83 

2,877.36 

237.04- 

133,827.01 

11,807.00 

145.498.62 

352,234.86 

180,936.62 

375.00 

52,869.99 
1,760.33 

53.611.07 
108.241.39 
641,787.87 



841.20 

115,366.15 

9,336.48 

1,115,411.68 

35,766.78 

93,570.81 

16,379.35 

17,706.60 

4,428.00 

42,584.49 

26/691.33 
705,396.01 

286,126.53 

340,147.22 

56,182.10 

90,239.24 

332,682.25 

51,743.84 

127,533.82 

1,291.48 

94,926.29 

4,382.13 

99,011.38 

25,894.49 
154,049.96 

11,079.09 

4,477.84 

6.437.86 

3,869,684.40 

1,566.664.11 

2,283,020.29 

2,924,808.16 



Liabilities , : 
Bonds Payable 
Customers 1 Deposits 
Interest Accrued 



Surplus: 

Loans Repayment 
Construction Contrib. 
Unappropriated Earned 
Surplus 



405,000.00 

11,807.00 

4.712.33 

421,519.33 



841,000.00 
11,698.92 

1.650,5^9 1 
2,503,288.83 



Total Liab. & Sur. 
33 



2.924.808.16 



Expenses : 
Generating : 
Operation, Supervision 



ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPARTMENT 
STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSE 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1973 

Sales: 



and Engineering 


13,828,92 


Fuel 


175.649.49 


Generation Expense: 




Labor 


96,781.47 


Lubricants 


10,365.09 


Maintenance : 




Supervision & Engineering 


11,133.04 


Structures - Power 


754.40 


Generator & Elec. Equip. 


21,408.43 


Misc. Other Expenses 


5.648.65 




335,^69.49 


Other Power Supply: 




Purchased Power 


474,653.68 


Distribution: 




Overhead Trans. Lines 


-0- 


Overhead Lines Exp. 


-0- 


Underground Lines Exp, 


-0- 


Meter Expenses 


11,249.75 


Maintenance: 




Supervision & Engineering 


11,025.00 


Dist. Station Equip. 


2,537.84 


Overhead Lines 


91,392.54 


Underground Lines 


4,650.42 


Maint. of Lines Trans. 


128.85 


Misc. Expenses 


9.897.05 


Maint. Street Light. & S.S. 




. 135.804.80 


Customers Accounts Receivable: 


Supervision 


5.258.69 


Meter Reading 


8,158.20 


Records & Collections 


34.129.37 




47,5^6.26 


Administrative & General: 




Salaries 


29,445.88 


Office Supplies & Exp. 


2,777.85 


Outside Services 


5.577.22 


Property Insurance: 




General 


-0- 


Power 


-0- 


Injuries & Daaages: 




General 


-0- 


Power 


-0- 


Employees Pensions 


-0- 


Maint. General Plant 


1,281.55 


Transportation 


9,446.81 


Depreciation 


112,179.00 


Interest on Bonds 


13.568.87 


Misc. General Expense 


4,076.36 


Interest Refunds 


122.62 




178,476.16 


Total Expenses 


1,171,950.39 


Net Profit 


269.712.83 




1.441.663.22 



Residential 


715.^73.60 


Home Heating 


61,915.08 


Apartment Heating 


46,251.52 


Commercial 


219,427.30 


Industrial 


192,152.69 


Commercial Heating 


1,502.46 


Street Lighting 


27,300.00 


Municipal Buildings 


43,013.67 


Private Area Lighting 


4,229.50 


Sales for Resale 


195.^20.13 


Misc. Service Rev. 


270.00 


Other Electric Rev. 


10.058.65 




1,517,014.60 


Less Disc. 4 Abate. 


83.698.36 


Net Sales 


1,433,416.24 


Other Income: 





Interest : 
On Depreciation Fund 
On Special Deposits 
Total Other Income 



5,148.36 
3.098.62 
8,246.98 



1.441.663.22 



34 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

BALANCE SHEET 
DECEMBER 31, 1973 



ASSETS 



Current Assets: 




Cash: 




Operations 1973 


(1,012.40) 


Operations-EncurQbered 1972 


(10,000.00) 


Plant Investment-1971 


1,399.57 


Const ruction-1971 


12,742.05 


Dow ! s Brook Reservoir 


516.69 


Water Main Construction 


430.71 


Construction 1973 


50.800.98 




54,877.60 


Accounts Receivable: 




Rates & Services 


34,708.21 


Added to Taxes 


2.407.72 




37,115.93 


Materials & Supplies 


30.775.88 


Total Current Assets 


122,769.41 


Fixed Assets: 




Engineering 


49,493.77 


Land 


20,249.72 


New Well System 


129,004.72 


Pumping Station 


65 ,555 .36 


Reservoirs &Standpipes 


436,627.27 


Storage Basins 


27,693.59 


Dist. Reservoirs 


135,979.62 


Departmental Buildings 


5.887.57 


Store House 


5,137.25 


Pumps & Pumping Equip. 


69,985.05 


Purification System 


8,177.55 


Pipe Lines & Dist. Mains 


1,354,308.87 


Service Pipes 


225,573.99 


Meters 


90,194.12 


Consumers Meters Installed 


1,750.40 


Hydrants 


40,362.63 


Misc. Expenditures 


1,912.10 


Office Equipment 


6,865.80 


Shop Equipment 


8,512.07 


Stores Equipment 


68.26 


Trans. Equipment 


43,517.20 


Misc. Equipment 


1S194.35, 




2,742,051.26 


Less Reserve for Deprec. 


907.370.08 




1,834,681.18 


Total Assets: 


1.957.450.59 



LIABILITIES 

Liabilities : 
Bonds Payable 

Surplus : 
Profit or Loss 
Town Contribution 

Campanelli Cont. 

APW Mass. 71 Cont. 

Property Account 

Electric Contribution 



320,000.00 

(25,246.69) 
416,505.58 

46,000.00 
179,5^4.52 
981,308.27 

39.338.91 

1,637,450.59 



1.957.450.59 



35 



WATER DEPARTMENT 
STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1973 



EXPENSES : 
Operating: 
Maintenance : 

Supply Structures 

Reservoirs 

Pumping Station Supplies 

Pumping Bui]. ding 

Pumping Equipment 

Inspection of Meters 

Mains 

Standpipes 

Services 

Meters 

Hydrants 
Electricity Purchased 
Purification Supplies 

and Expenses 
General Labor 



Administrative : 

General Office Salaries 
General Office Supplies 

and Expenses 
Insurance 
Transportation 
Maintenance : 

General Structures 
Depreciation 
Pensions 

Interest on Bonds 
Misc. General Expenses 



Total Expenses: 
Profit or (Loss) 



81.07 

-0- 
3^8.25 
2,658.91 
6,888.13 

-0- 
6,684.00 

-0- 

10,649.59 
5,016.32 
7,053.20 

11,058.95 

6,850.41 
13.011.46 
70,300.29 



28,047.44 

3,446.18 
-0- 

5,825.37 

315.56 
-0- 

-0- 
9,290.08 
300.80 
47,225.43 

117.525.72 

82.S20.97 
200.046.69 



SALES : 

Metered 

Flat Rate 

Sale of Supplies 

Rent from Water Meters 

Tap-in Charges 
Application Charges 
Misc. Non-Operating Tnnome 4. 256.32 
Total Sales 216,016.38 



191,998.60 

10,222.50 

3,388.96 

1,920.00 

63O.OO 

3,600.00 



Less Discounts 
Abatements 



15,642.76 
^26.93 



200.046.69 



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38 



XIII Revenues 





1970 


1971 


1972 


1973 


Chapter 70 


14.12,601.98 


569,679.96 


568,870.21 


670,665*71 


Chapter 70- 1972 










Adjustment 


-0- 


-0- 


-C- 


16,598*61 


Chapter 69 (Special Education 


) 








Ed. Deaf & Blind 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


168.00 


Chapter 69 & 71 Special 










Education Programs 


31,8lZ.OO 


3li,993.00 


U5,238.00 


235*257.03 


Tuition & Trans, State 










Wards-Chapter 76 


6,182.61 


6,600*67 


7,285.06 


17,1x71.21 


School Transportation 


73,04.6.92 


60,351.61 


76,390.00 


122,233.69 


School Transportation 










(Outside) 








QlU.62 


School Lunch 


37,022.01 


1x0,000.00 


52,1x81.16 


l8,9!xU.llx 


School Construction 


69,337.06 




52,666.714. 


162,597.51 


Vocational Education 










Trans . Chapter TU- 


5,700.00 


6,270*00 


8,5Ux.00 


5,505.00 


NDEA Title III PL 85-86 


5,7014.. 86 


-0- 


-0- 


2,287.98 


ESEA Title II 


1,591.57 


1,600.00 


3,651.91 


3,1x67.77 


ESEA Title II Special C-rsmt 








700.00 


ESEA Title I Low Income 


9, 2ia« 00 


9,200.00 


13,002.00 


11,632.00 


ESEA Title VI B 








lx,lx93.00 


Training Teachers - 










ndicapped Children 








1,500.00 


Revenue From Local Sources 


11,111.53 


12,500.00 


8,717.93 


12, 126 Jl!i 


Revenue From Other Districts 


12,71x0.00 


12,700.00 


5,390.00 


l,b60.00 



39 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Armand R. Brouillette, Chief 

The Pohce Department has continued its fight against 
the national trend of increased violent and non-violent 
crime. However, we like many other areas of suburban 
and rural jurisdictions in the country have not been able 
to contain crime at the level that it was in 1972. 

As you may recall, last year I was able to report to 
you a decrease in the incidence of crime. This year I 
cannot make a similar report. As you will note in the 
statistical table below those crimes which some of us 
have been victims of and all of us have been exposed 
to, Ipswich shows an increase in crime against the 
person and property. For those of you who are 
mathematically inclined the percentage increase is very 
alarming. Percentage increases are used to tabulate F.B.I. 
crime reports. I find actual figures easier to cope with. 

We have asked the Town to increase the force by 
three men. The reason being the loss of five E.E.A. 
personnel in this department. In 1973 only one man 
was added to the department. We have used this man to 
the best advantage of the Town, but unfortunately not 
enough coverage was had to offset the loss of the five 
that we lost. Therefore, I will ask and recommend to 
the Town that two men be added to the force to make 
up for this loss. With the increase in personnel a savings 
will be seen in overtime to cover shifts with a minimum 
of three officers without paying overtime, as well as the 
protection that will be afforded by an increase of 
patrolling officers as was demonstrated in 1972. 



There are presently 18 fulltime officers to cover 33 
square miles of area and render service to over 11,000 
people. 

Chief: Armand Brouillette 
Sergeants: 

Boley Radzinski 9 

Frank Geist 

Joseph Carpenter » 
Patrolmen: 

Walter Klimaszewski 

Edward Rauscher 

Arthur Solomonides 

Peter Foote 

Richard Lombard 

Edward Walsh 

John Poirier 

George Stevenson o 

James Souter 

Charles Surpitski 

Richard Burns 

Charles Schwartz 

Erroll Tyler » 

Charles Cooper 



STATISTICAL TABLE 

Murder 

Manslaughter 

Robbery 

Assault 

Larcenies 

Auto Theft 

Vandalism 

Auto Accidents 

Complaints Answered 



1972 


1973 


1 


3 


1 


2 





2 


66 


99 


284 


294 


33 


44 


439 


454 


827 


527 


8411 


8097 



CIVIL DEFENSE 




CrVIL DEFENSE 
John R. Harrigan 



In 1973 a new dimension was added to the 
capability of Ipswich Civil Defense as the staff began to 
step up collection of information to help anticipate 
events that might lead to civil disasters. 

Through this expanded concept the civil defense of 
Ipswich has greatly increased the capability to respond 



to a wide variety of emergency situations, to the direct 
and immediate benefit of the citizens of Ipswich. 

The capability of governments to function in peace 
time emergency of every kind can strengthen the 
communities and prepare them to cope with the 
ever-present threat of natural disasters. 

1973 proved once again to be an active year . . . the 
Auxiliary Police augmenting the regular police when 
needed, and the Auxiliary Fire Department became 
better organized and was called to function as a unit to 
backup the regular fire department when needed. 

The capability of the radio group was strengthened 
due to the "FM" move. Complete coverage of town 
radio network was completed at the E.O.C. Many hours 
of toil were spent by this group to make this possible! 

The excellent rapport between the police and fire 
chief has made Civil Defense operation a smooth 
working backup team which they can rely on. 

I would like to publicly thank all those who 
participated in Civil Defense work in Ipswich for a job 
well done. 



27 



AUXILIARY POLICE 




Auxiliary Police who covered for the regular police during the Policemans Ball Friday, November 30, included, left to right. Patrolman 
John Clogston, Captain Rudolph Provost, Patrolman Mike Singer and Sgt. Robie Wile. (Ipswich Chronicle) 



AUXILIARY POLICE 
Rudolph Provost, Captain 

The following is a summarized report of the 
activities for the year 1973: 

— Monthly Meetings on the first Wednesday of each 
month. 

— Spring Patrol. 

Friday nights from April 6th to May 25 th. 
2 men each night from 7:00 P.M. to Midnight. 

— Summer Patrol. 

From June 1st to September 1st. 

2 Men 3 Nights a week Thursday, Friday, and 

Saturday. 7:00 P.M. to Midnight. 

— Fall Patrol. 

Friday nights from September 7th to November 

23rd. 

2 Men 7:00 P.M. to Midnight. 

— Traffic Patrol for the Bike-A-Thon. 
Sunday, April 29, 1973. 



— Traffic Patrol for Ipswich Days and Marathon. 
August 1, 1973 to August 5, 1973. 

— Memorial Day Parade. 

17 Men marched - 3 traffic duty. 

— Halloween Night Patrol. 
Coverage of all schools. 

— Substituted for regular police on November 30, 1973 
during the Policemen's Ball. 20 Men. 

— Call Outs. 
April 28, 1973. 

Called out to search for 3 lost boys at Eagle Hill. 
December 5, 1973. 

Called out during the power failure to cover the 
banks. 

— Liaison Officer Edward Raucher resigned due to 
other commitments. 

Officer Jack Poirier is named new Liaison Officer by 
Chief Armand Brouillette. 



28 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Theodore F. Mozdziez, Chief 

The Fire Department activities have increased this 
year. This is relative to the town's growth in buildings 
and population. The new 100' Aerial Ladder purchased 
from American La France Co. is in service. It is a 
welcomed and needed addition to our fire equipment. 
The old floor which needed repairs has been replaced 
with a new one. 



The following is a brief summary of activities: 



Bell Alarms 

Still Alarms 

Complaints investigated 

Oil Burner Inspections carried out 

Oil Permits Issued 

Oil Tank Inspections 

Blasting Permits Issued 

Hospital and Nursing Home Inspections 

Fire Alarm Extension 

Hose used 

Booster Tank Water used 



98 
254 
116 



Fire Loss Report: 

Value of Buildings Threatened 

by Fire is 
Insurance Carried 
Estimated Loss 
Insurance Paid 



6 new boxes 

10,950 feet 

43,270 gals. 



$1,519,890 

52,562,200 

S69,079 

S67.578.27 



In conclusion, I would like to briefly state some 
matters that need serious attention. The present station 
cannot adequately house our present needs. There are 
four pieces of apparatus and the rescue boat that must 
be kept outdoors for lack of space. Construction of a 
new sub-station in the outer Lmebrook area is needed 
due to the rapid growth in the past few years. A survey 




The Town received the new 100' Aerial Ladder Truck. 

(Ipswich Chronicle) 

of our present fire alarm system shows nearly 50% of 
the present street boxes are 50-70 years old and need 
updating or replacement with a modern type fire alarm 
system. 




29 



SHELLFISH - HARBOR DEPARTMENT 




SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 

Arthur Moon 

The year 1973 was a very good year for commercial 
diggers. This was caused by the red tide which caused 
the closing of clam areas. Some of the areas were closed 
for almost a year. At the present time only soft shell 
clams and mussels can be harvested. 



The following permits were issued: 
Commercial 

Non-Commercial: Resident Yearly 
Non-Commercial: Non-Resident Daily 
Non-Commercial: Non-Resident Yearly 



202 at $20.00 
711 at 2.50 
307 at 2.50 

197 at 15.00 



One or two days a week I took samples of clams to 
the Lawrence Lab to test for red tide so we could get 
the flats opened. I worked with Dr. Moore analyzing 
water and shellfish for feed and small clams in the 
water. There was a program on transplanting small clams 
and putting nets out for catching seed clams. 

We had volunteer skin divers working off shore to 
see what shellfish we had in deep water. The work was 
from shore to Vh. miles out in 110 feet of water. We 
found a large amount of different types of shellfish. I 
would like to thank the skin divers for their help. 

The Shellfish Advisory Board was very active in all 
areas. 





HARBORMASTER 

Pete S. Georgakopoulos 

As my appointment as Harbormaster for the Town 
of Ipswich began April 23, 1973, we had a late start. 

Three assistant harbormasters were recommended and 
approved. Fred Janvrin was assigned to the Eagle Hill 
area, Yacht Club and Rowley River. Al Hurd was 
assigned to the Wharf area, Ipswich River, Castle Neck 
River and Hood's Pond. Arthur Kapsalis was assigned to 
Plum Island, Crane's Beach and the Pavillion Area. All 
three are non-paying volunteers and all of us use our 
own boats and motors, etc. 

The Ipswich River and Eagle Hill Areas were marked 
with trees and plastic jugs used as markers. These 
markers were as accurate as they could have been, but 
the treacherous shifting sand has created problems. This 
made a safety hazzard even to a boat with very little 
draft. 

With the cooperation of the Electric Light 
Department and Department of Public Works, the ramp 
and floats were put in the water, and again hauled out 
for the season. 

A new 8' x 30' heavy duty float arrived late in the 
season. Two 3' x 20' floats were jury rigged at the state 
built ramp to enbark and debark passengers safely. 

This year saw us through with no accidents. Several 
search and rescues were made for missing people and 
one included the Coast Guard helicopter, state and local 
police, fire department, civil defense, and many more 
volunteers. 

Shark warnings were issued for our area and one was 
harpooned inside the Eagle Hill River, and several 
sighted after. 

The number of boats in our area has made the 
mooring problem our main issue. Only ten moorings 
were issued . . . many were outright refused . . and many 
boats were notified to move out of the channel. 

Other issues we will face will be the River dredging, 
Marinas, and the Upper River. 

At the present time I would like to build up my 
inventory with the following emergency items: 
Walki-Talkie, Signal Flares, Life Rings and Jackets and 
Hand Lanterns. 



30 



SHELLFISH ADVISORY COMMISSION 



SHELLFISH ADVISORY COMMISSION 
Charles Terrell, Chairman 



The shellfish industry of Ipswich began the agonizing 
task of rebuilding after the disastrous red tide of 1972. 
The first clam flats reopened just before Christmas, 
1972 and by the following June most of the remainder 
had reopened. The intervening six months went slowly 
as only minor flats reopened at first, but as summer 
approached major flats as the Spit, Beach Reef and 
Middle Ground became safe to utilize. Due to an 
anticipated heavy demand in the summer the Shellfish 
Commission opened the above areas for only three days 
a week to spread the supply over the summer. This 
policy proved successful, and was instituted after a 
heavy, three day pounding on Ritchie's Ground at its 
mid-June opening. As a result of the red tide episode 
local legislators were able to get several money bills 
through the legislature to investigate the causes and 
possible ways to minimize any new occurrance. Money 
was approved for a monitoring program of the coast by 
the Massachusetts Department of Public Health to detect 
future outbreaks, as well as money to perform pure and 
applied, scientific research by the Massachusetts Division 
of Marine Fisheries and Massachusetts Science and 
Technology Foundation. By the end of 1972 all Ipswich 
shellfish had been cleared of paralytic shellfish poison, 
except sea clams, which still had a red tide count 
slightly above the permissable safe level. 

While many of the clam flats remained closed in the 
first part of 1972, the commission's shellfish 
improvement program lay in abeyance. The program was 
reactivated in the summer with the approval of a 



shellfish survey of the previously unexplored waters in 
Ipswich Bay. With a research boat supplied by the 
Division of Marine Fisheries, and six scuba divers, half 
of whom were local residents, underwater dives were 
performed a half mile to two miles off Plum Island and 
Crane's Beach in 30 to 110 feet of water. The divers 
located commercial quantities of arctic (black or 
mahogany) quahogs and some ocean (deep sea) scallops. 
The Division of Marine Fisheries is presently examining 
how the arctic quahogs might be utilized on a 
commercial basis. 

Toward the end of the year Shellfish Constable, 
Arthur Moon, spread a polyester, knitted fabric of 
quarter inch mesh over part of the Eagle Hill River flats 
in an attempt to catch and hold soft shell clam larvae 
during the autumn seeding. The fabric caught seed, 
which has remained in the flat to date, even though the 
fabric was removed prior to winter storms. It is hoped 
that this technique can be expanded in the future to 
help revive some of the unproductive clam flats of the 
town. A complete reseeding program is expected to 
begin in the spring by transplanting excess soft shell 
clams from productive areas to unproductive areas. This 
program will help increase the yield of clams in the 
town because many flats can grow clams even though 
they will not reproduce well in these same areas. 

In another program Dr. Johnes K. Moore, a marine 
biologist of Salem State College and a consultant to the 
commission, has been investigating and analyzing the 
clam flats for the past year to determine soft shell clam 
populations as well as temperature and salinity of local 
waters. A report on his findings will be presented to the 
commission this spring and will form the basis for a 
possible, federally funded shellfish project in Ipswich. 




Both buckets contain famous Ipswich soft shell clams. The 
smaller clams are used for steamers, while the larger clams are 
used in chowders or baked, stuffed clams. The larger clams at 5 
to 6 inches long are about 8 to 10 years old and are locally 
known as "honks". 




Local diver, Paul McLaughlin, prepares with other divers for a 
deep water dive to 110 feet off Plum Island as part of the 
shellfish survey a mile to two miles off shore. Commercial 
quantities of artic quahogs were located within Ipswich's waters. 



31 



BOARD OF HEALTH 





BOARD OF HEALTH 
Edwin N. Bronk, Agent 

There were 169 plumbing permits and 102 gas 
permits issued in 1973. 



Clinics held throughout the year: 

Well Child Clinic: 

This well child clinic is held the first Monday of 
each month at the Winthrop school between the hours 
of 3:00 and 4:00 P.M. This clinic is operated for pre 
school children who are examined for any medical or 
physical defects, and administering of immunization for 
measles, rubella, D.P.T., Polio, etc., for which no fee is 
charged. 

Rabies Clinic: 

The rabies clinic was conducted in May, and a total 
of 189 dogs and cats were immunized and a total of 
$378.00 was turned into the Town Treasury. 

A total of 85 percolation and ground water tests 
were conducted during the period of April 20 and June 
18, 1973, of this total, 64 sites were approved for 
construction of installation of individual septic systems, 
and 21 were disapproved as not meeting the standards 
of Article XI of the State Sanitary Code. 

105 Burial permits were issued by the Board of 
Health, and permits were issued for: Oleo, milk, 
restaurants, collection of fat and bones, individual septic 
systems, ice cream manufacturing, etc. 



VETERAN'S SERVICES 



VETERANS' SERVICES 

Frank Story, Director 

Massachusetts Veterans' Benefits 

The primary function of the Veterans' Benefits 
program is to relieve hardship. It deals with disability, 
unemployment, the unemployable, illness, strikes and, 
even, disaster. It is, therefore, difficult to estimate with 
great accuracy the expenditure under this program. The 
number of veterans and their dependents receiving 
assistance in the Town of Ipswich under Chapter 115 of 
the General Laws, as amended, is being reported by the 
number of cases processed monthly, as follows: January 
- 63, February - 70, March - 72, April - 73, May — 
68, June - 66, July - 68, August - 66, September - 
64, October - 65, November - 69, December - 69. A 
total of 813 cases were processed this year. There were 
29 applications for the Massachusetts Vietnam Bonus. 
Exclusive of the bonus, 50% of the cost of the Benefit 
program is reimbursed by the State. Expenditures are 
listed in the financial statement of the Town Report. 



Veterans' Services — Federal 

It is the prime purpose of this department to secure 
all Federal funds for which veterans and their 



dependents have entitlement. Services rendered to 
veterans and their dependents are as follows: 20 
Applications for Replacement of Separation Documents, 
32 Education Applications, 51 Power of Attorney 
forms, 18 Applications for Hospital Treatment, 21 
Applications for Real Estate Abatement, 8 Treasury 
Checks returned, 25 Applications for Pensions and 
Compensations, 38 Statements in Support of Claim, 9 
Statements of Income and Net Worth, 21 Applications 
for Outpatient Treatment, 56 Annual Questionnaire 
cards, 20 Change of Address forms, 18 Certificates of 
Eligibility, 6 claims for Insurance or Indemnity, 8 
Requests and Consent to Release Information, 2 
Applications for Vocational Rehabilitation, 1 1 Requests 
for Change of School or Program, 18 Requests for 
School Attendance, 1 1 Headstone Applications, 6 Flag 
Applications, 14 Requests for Copy of War Records and 
8 Applications for Insurance Claims. 



Compensations and Pensions obtained through this 
office for Ipswich veterans and their dependents totaled 
$291,516.00 for the year. Hospitalization in VA 
facilities saved the Town of Ipswich $41,720.00. 
Educational benefits being received by veterans and their 
dependents total $87,130.00. The above categories 
represent a total saving for the Town of Ipswich in the 
amount of $420,366.00. For Federal money received, 
there is no State or Town participation. 



32 



ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT 



ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT 

Alfred L. Tobiasz, Manager 

Construction of the new Electric Light Department 
building on High Street was started in December and 
work is proceeding on schedule. 

The people of Ipswich have responded to the need to 
curtail power usage. Our records show a decrease of 3% 
of kilowatt demand for November and 9.5% for 
December of 1973, as compared to power used in 1972. 

MAJOR CONSTRUCTION PROPOSED 

1. Complete 25 KV spacer cable installation on High 
Street from substation No. 4 to Mitchell Road. 

2. Install spacer cable on Broadway Avenue and Farley 
Avenue. 

3. Install new 3 phase cable from Pillow Lace Lane 
along Linebrook Road to the Topsfield town line. 

CONSTRUCTION COMPLETED 

1. Spacer cable has been installed on Linebrook Road 
from Plains Road to Newbury Road and on High 
Street from substation No. 4 to the Rowley line. 

2. Capacitors were installed on North Ridge Road and 
Little Neck Road. 

3. 24 street lighting fixtures, 30 overhead services and 21 
underground services, 9 poles, 25,287 feet overhead 
wire and 9,238 feet of underground cables and 535 
KVA of transformers were added to the system. 



MAINTENANCE 

43 overhead and 10 underground services, 88 
and 57 streetlight fixtures were replaced. 



poles 







STATISTICS 






Year 


Aver. 


KWH used 


by 


KW peak 


Meters in 




Residential customers 


Demand 


Service 


1953 




2381 




3125 


3108 


1958 




2373 




4870 


3465 


1963 




3114 




6590 


3841 


1968 




4071 




9850 


4119 


1973 




6284 




12250 


4654 






GENERATION 







Maintenance was carried out by station personnel and 
all units are in good operating condition. The annual 
peak KW demand was 12250 KW on January 8, 1973 
which represents an increase of 1.6% over last year. 

POWER GENERATED AND PURCHASED 



Generated 
Purchased 
Total KWH 



1971 

25,212,720 
25,246,768 
50,459,488 



1972 

28,047,280 
28,003,200 
56,050,480 



1973 

25,452,920 
33,233,684 
58,686,604 



This represents an increase of 4.7% over last year. 



During a black out in the fall of 
1973, Electric Employees inspect the 
dials for a reason 'why?'. 

(Ipswich Chronicle) 




33 



RECREATION DEPARTMENT 




RECREATION - PARKS DEPARTMENT 
James H. Daly, Director 



Progress based on common sense and safety continues 
to be the watchword in these twin departments. 
Facilities and equipment have been expanded in the past 
15 months. In conjunction, attendance and participation 
in long standing and new programs has increased 
sharply. Gratefully acknowledged is the use of 
ready-made facilities at the Sacred Heart Juniorate (Don 
Bosco), Notre Dame and LaSalette. These three Orders 
have made available a combination of three softball 
fields, one baseball field, four tennis courts and two 
basketball courts at no cost to the town and all of 
which have and will continue to be used extensively. 

Special and sincere thanks are hereby directed to the 
officials at Don Bosco who allowed the town the use of 
their king-sized outdoor swim pool that proved to be a 
boon to the REC swim instruction classes for 
youngsters; to the officers and members of the Ipswich 
Fish & Game Club for the continuing use of the Skeet 
Field as a playground for neighborhood youngsters; to 
the V.F.W. local Post 1093 and its Auxiliary for their 
perennial financial support and the use of their hall and 
grounds; to the Rust brothers (new owners of Casali's 
Restaurant) and former owner Al Casali for their 
continuing cooperation in allowing outer Linebrook 
children the use of their property where major 
improvements have been made to the ball field, rest 
rooms will have been added and outdoor bubblers will 
be available and last but not least to all town 
departments who have cooperated fully in helping this 
department to accomplish many projects by the loan of 
equipment and operators. 

For the benefit of newcomers it should be repeated 
here that your REC dept. offers a year round program 



for all age groups both male and female. For the most 
part, those programs involving children are municipally 
supported while most others are self-supporting by the 
participants. In either case the Rec. Dept. sponsors 
and/or lends a helping hand in the planning and 
execution of four softball leagues, two Pony baseball 
teams, a ten week summer swim instruction program, an 
eight week summer playground program, a winter long 
indoor basketball and volleyball program, a program for 
special children on a year round basis (weekly) and a 
variety of other activities. 

Your Rec. Dept. plays key roles in the continuing 
successes and expansion of the Golden Age Club and 
Olde Ipswich Week activities. Tennis instruction boomed 
this past year and is expected to expand again in 1974. 
Many tourneys are being planned. Softball activity for 
youngsters and oldsters is also on the increase. Outdoor 
ice skating at Linebrook playground and Baker's Pond 
(Daniel Boone Park) is expected to show a decline this 
winter as these activities shift to the more dependable 
and safe indoor rinks that are springing up everywhere. 

In the immediate future it is expected that the 
current energy crisis coupled with existing public 
concern with ecology and conservation will tend to 
encourage more and more individuals and families to 
become more conscious of and participate more actively 
in all phases of recreation. Especially the out of doors 
type. To this end your REC dept. is currently searching 
for new areas, new facilities, new programs and fresh - 
new ideas which will be announced through the news 
media as they develop. 

The Lighthouse at the beach, last of a complex of 
buildings granted to the town by the Federal 
Government many years ago was destroyed by fire with 
the obvious assistance of vandals this past year. Its 
"passing" is a blessing in disguise. One could write a 
'best seller' volume on the shenanigans associated with 
this unpretentious six room structure but suffice it to 
say that the town and department is now out of the 
real estate, motel and party business and the associated 
headaches. With all due respect to the few families who 
used the cottage for the purposes intended we say 
thank you for your cooperation. Generally speaking, 
however, the cottage was both misused and abused and 
was a constant target for seagulls and vandals. Amen! 

For the benefit of Ipswich families, organizations and 
individuals and considering the complete absence of 
shade at the beach it is hereby recommended that the 
cottage be replaced by a pavillion type shelter at the 
same location, constructed of non-combustible materials 
of adequate size to accommodate family and group 
picnics and clambakes. 




34 



Memorial Building 

This building ideally located in the center of town 
continues to serve several organizations for meetings and 
socials. It is here that the Recreation - Parks office is 
located as well as the Youth Commission office. The 
American Legion and its Auxiliary are permanent 
residents. Other organizations that use the facility 
extensively include the Girl Scouts, Sea Scouts & 
Mariners, the Youth Hockey Association, Little League, 
the AMVETS & Auxiliary and many others. Several 
recreation programs including the Special Childrens' 
program, ballroom dance instruction for adults etc. take 
place here. The hall is also used by the Rec. dept. when 
certain outdoor programs are forced indoors by 
inclement weather. 

The little used top hall, however, could easily and 
economically be converted into a physical fitness gym 
with the built in addition of showers, sauna and basic 
gym equipment. The plan is under study within the 
Rec. dept. and may be proposed at some future date. 




Thanks to Don Bosco, the Town had the use of a swimming 
pool for their summer swimming instructions. (Ipswich Chronicle) 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 




PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Eleanor M. Crowley, Librarian 

Library material amounting to 126,769 items was 
circulated among 6,620 registered borrowers of the 
Public Library. In looking at these figures it is 
important to bear in mind that they represent units that 
leave the library, and do not reflect the high level of 
use of reference materials that do not circulate. Well 
over 50% of the population is registered with the 
library. Books added to the collection in 1973 total 
3,047. 

Our local resources continue to be strengthened by 
participation in the Eastern Regional Library System. 
Daily truck delivery service brings to Ipswich books, 
films and other material from member libraries of the 
Region, including Boston Public Library. 

A feature film series was begun this year; a diversity 
of programs for all interests continues, ranging from an 



evening with Boston Patriots player Tom Beer to a 
woodwind quartet, sponsored by the Friends of the 
Library. Book "stations" have been established at the 
Youth Center and at Whittier Manor. 

School use of public library facilities is at a high 
level, with an average of 500 young people visiting 
during the school day in an average month. The 
shortage of space increases daily, and is dramatized as 
students share work space with the book collection. 

Ipswich shared in the award of a Federal Grant 
under LSCA Title I, FY 1972-73. The sum of $500.00 
was used to purchase audiovisual equipment for use in 
the local Oral History project, "Ipswich Speaks". 

Legal steps allowing transfer of the Library to the 
town are nearing completion, and the matter of 
acceptance will be ready for consideration by the town 
at the Annual Town Meeting. 

Service to the community is our goal; let us supply 
you with the best and the latest in informational, 
recreational and educational material. 




35 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Jane Bokron, Executive Director 

There are currently four (4) housing projects 
administered by The Ipswich Housing 
Authority . . . 200-1 - 667 -C - 667-3 - 707. 

NEW PROJECTS APPROVED BY THE STATE: The 
Department of Community Affairs of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts has approved the 
construction of 24 additional Low Income Family Units 
(Project 705) at Southern Heights and 80 additional 
Low Income Elderly Units (Project 667-4) at Southern 
Manor. These units have been scheduled to be 
completed within two years. 

200-1 PROJECT - LOW INCOME FAMILY: These 
twenty-four (24) Low Income Family Units were built 
in 1950. The seven (7) buildings consist of 14 (2 
bedroom units,) 8 (3 bedroom units and 2 (4 bedroom 
units). There are currently 53 children living on this 
area. Each unit has its own gas furnace, hot water 
heater and gas stove. The average shelter rent is $63.00 
per month. During 1973 the following improvements 
were made in this project: new roofs and gutters on all 
buildings, new kitchen sinks and counter tops, new tile 
bathroom floors, new kitchen inlaid floor coverings, new 
hot water heaters, individual gas shutoffs, individual 
outside faucets, combination doors, weather stripping on 
all outside doors, many apartments were completely 
painted, new mail boxes were installed and last but not 
least the Ipswich Housing Authority sewer tie-in to the 
Town of Ipswich municipal sewer system was started in 
August 1973 and will be completed in the spring of 
1974. 



ELDERLY PROJECTS . . . 667 -C and 667-3: The 
Ipswich Housing Authority has a total of 120 elderly 
units in these two projects. Southern Manor has 20 
elderly units heated by gas. Caroline Avenue has 100 
elderly units heated by electricity. The shelter rent for 
these projects is $62.00 per month. The Authority pays 
for all utilities. Average age is 75 years young. During 
1973 the following improvements were made at 
Southern Manor: Each unit had a new gas stove and a 
white Colonial combination door installed. Late in 1973 
am all brick Maintenance Building and Garage was 
constructed at Southern Manor for the use of all 
projects. A Colonial white wooden electrical sign was 
installed at Southern Manor. At Caroline Avenue, door 
chimes with a peep hole were installed in the first 42 
units. New park benches were conveniently placed in 
both elderly projects. 

707 PROJECT - RENT SUBSIDY PROGRAM: This 
is a program which provides subsidy for low income 
families, including elderly people. It allows the 
Authority to rent private apartments and to pay a rent 
supplement to make up the difference in the agreed 
total monthly rent for the apartment. In 1973 the 
Authority paid $50,056 in rent subsidies to private 
landlords for 55 units. 

TENANT ORGANIZATION: In 1971 The Authority 
set up a Tenant Organization. Tenant Representatives 
attend all monthly meetings to voice their suggestions 
and complaints from their own respective projects. 

OFFICE HELP: Late in 1973 The Authority hired a 
full time office girl to assist the Executive Director. 



L to R 
Alexander Bemhard 
Glenfred Wanzer 
Jane Bokron 
Arthur Weagle 
Stanley Eustace 
John Thatcher, Jr. 

(House of Hinlin) 




36 



ESSEX COUNTY MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 



THE ESSEX COUNTY MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 

Robert W. Spencer, Superintendent 

Because of abnormal rainfall during the previous year, 
1973 promised to be an exceptionally heavy mosquito 
producer and lived up to expectations in so far as the 
spring brook of fresh water mosquitoes was concerned. 
However, mother nature interceded and a combination 
of low running tides and sparse rainfall during the 
summer prevented the usual heavy production of salt 
marsh mosquitoes until late August and early 
September. 

The Project once again conducted a weekly fogging 
program in Ipswich during the mosquito season. The 
serious outbreak of mosquito-borne Eastern Encephalitis 
in southern New Hampshire during late August caused 
us to alter our fogging schedule somewhat and to 
concentrate our efforts from August 21 through 
September 7 in the Essex County towns closest to the 
state line to prevent as best we could the southward 
progress of the disease. Starting September 10, the State 
Health Department aerial-sprayed the entire Essex 
County area successfully exterminating the late broods 
of salt marsh and fresh water mosquitoes. 

I believe it worthy to note here that because of the 
increased concern of some local residents over the use 
of Malathion for mosquito fogging by this Project and 
the allegations that we were indeed causing considerable 
damage to fish and wildlife, domestic animals, and even 
humans; we conducted very comprehensive inspections 
of both the salt marsh and upland areas in the district 
prior to, during, and after the massive aerial-spray. As 
Malathion was employed at a dosage several times 
greater than used for mosquito fogging, we were 



delighted to find and are pleased to report no visible 
damage whatsoever to any creatures other than those in 
the insect world. Even the loss to bee keepers which 
was expected to be considerable, amounted to but a 
small percentage of the total population of the colonies. 

The Essex County Project continues to emphasize 
strongly the permanent aspects of a year-round program, 
namely the larviciding, drainage and water management 
directed toward the reduction of the breeding potential 
by elimination of the breeding source. In keeping with 
this policy the following was accomplished in Ipswich 
during 1973: 

Prehatch or winter ice dusting — 77 acres. 

Application of larvicide to open water — 45 acres. 

Brushing out along brooks and streams — 2,400 feet. 

Upland ditching and dredging with power equipment 
- 945 feet off Town Farm Road and 2,150 feet of 
Kimball Brook beginning at Estes Street and continuing 
to Bush Hill Road. 

Fogging to control adult mosquitoes on June 15, 29; 
July 13, 27; August 10, 24. 

We thank the residents for their continued interest in 
the mosquito control program. What 1974 with the 
energy crisis will bring is difficult to predict. At this 
point it is safe to assume that we will be forced to cut 
back in the use of power equipment and rely more on 
manual labor in several phases of our operations. 




"COOPERATIVE EFFORTS" 
The Public Works Department's Backhoe and the Essex County Mosquito Control's Backhoe work jointly in dredging a ditch. 

(Ipswich Chronicle) 



37 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 




DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 
Kevin D. McElhinney, Director 

The Public Works Department coordinates the 
activities of the Highway, Forestry, Water, Sewer, Town 
Hall Building Maintenance, and Equipment Maintenance 
Divisions to assure the most effective operations. 
Department personnel are interchanged to assist with 
larger projects as required. 



Highway Division 
Norman Stone, Foreman 



Surface treatment consisting of oil, stone and sand 
mixtures were applied to the following streets: 



Bayview Road 
Beechwood Road 
Boxford Road 
Bunker Hill Road 
Candlewood Road 
Charlotte Road 
Fellov's Road 
Leslie Road 
Masconomet Road 



Mile Lane 
Newbury Road 
North Ridge Road 
Plains Road 
Randall Road 
Sagamore Road 
Stage Hill Road 
Town Farm Road 
Upper River Road 



Building Maintenance 

Capital Improvements in the Town Hall were 
restricted to the installation of a new ceiling in the 
front hall. Five thousand dollars is appropriated for 
painting the exterior of the building and we hope to 
have this accomplished by the spring of 1974. 



Equipment Maintenance 
John McParland, Mechanic 

All Town vehicles are serviced and repaired at the 
Town Garage. Records are kept to show maintenance 
costs and gas and oil usage on each individual vehicle; 
statistical records of these expenses are maintained at 
the Public Works Administration office. 



Forestry Division 

Armand Michaud, Tree Warden 

This division is charged with all Town tree work. 
Duties also include line clearing for the Electric 
Department and the Mosquito Control program. 



Water Division 

Henry Chouinard, Foreman 

Water quality, rather than quantity, was once again 
the main concern of the division. Water quality 
complaints were logged and, due to the analysis of this 
log, the main cause of red water complaints was 
determined to originate at the Winthrop Wells. This 
supply is used only when necessary and an appreciable 
dropping of red water complaints has been the result. 
Funds will be requested so that an engineering study 
can be performed to determine a method of controlling 
this problem at the source. 

A brief summation of the division's functions is as 
follows: 



New asphaltic-wearing surfaces were applied on the 
following streets: 



Abell Avenue 
Bush Hill Road 
High Street 
Juniper Street 



Linebrook Road 
Oakhurst Avenue 
Topsfield Road 





1971 


1972 


1973 


New meters installed 


101 


102 


43 


Meters replaced 


97 


131 


244 


Services turned on 


165 


167 


164 


Services turned off 


148 


163 


145 


New services 


56 


55 


63 


Services discontinued 


1 


1 


6 


Hydrants installed 


12 


3 


10 


Hydrants removed 











New water mains installed 


16,926' 





3,460' 


Total length of mains 






386,707' 


Water Services: 








Metered services 






3,031 


Unmetered sales 






142 


Summer services 






173 


Total 






3.346 


Water usage (gallons) 


417,307,900 


479,426,150 


465,267,600 


Highest Day 6/20/73 






3,048,100 



In addition, Division personnel worked on snow and 
ice operations, drainage maintenance, and assisted on 
sewerage construction. 



38 



Public Works Snow Plowing 
Crew remove snow from the 
center of Town. 

(Chronicle) 




Sewer Division 

Chester Wile, Treatment Plant Operator 



Work has begun on the sewer extension from South 
Main Street to the veterans' project on County Road 
and should be completed in the spring of 1974. We are 
still waiting for funding for the Secondary Sewage 
Treatment Plant and if approved, work should begin 
during the spring. 

Division personnel performed normal routine 
maintenance and inspected all connections to the 
Town's sewer system. Records were kept, and divisional 
statistics are as follows: 






1971 


1972 


1973 


Sewage treated/daily average 


476,846 gls. 


628,184 gls. 


542,150 gls. 


Total Sewage Treated 


176,249,000 gls. 


229,287,000 gls. 


197,885,000 gls. 


New Connections 


81 


99 


62 


Total Connections 






984 


Chlorine used 


13.8 tons 


16.2 tons 


16.125 tons 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 




BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Ralph Hebert 

Due to the national standardization of the building 
code, the building inspector was required to attend 
several seminars conducted by State and Federal 
Agencies. In depth courses were mandatory and covered 
such subjects as Wetland Protective Act; Subdivision 
Control; Building for Energy Conservation, in addition 
to the study and review of the National Building Code 
which will become effective January 1, 1975. 



1973 
Construction Valuations $2,126,611.00 
Fees Collected 3,175.50 

Permits Issued: 

New Construction 59 

Miscellaneous: 

Additions, remodeling, 

signs, pools and siding 127 



1972 
$1,925,925.00 
2,839.00 

49 



67 



39 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 




CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 
Walter H. Hulbert, Jr., Supt. 

The death rate this year resulted in 96 interments, 
compared to 109 in 1972 and 117 in 1971. 

Two eight grave lots, five four grave lots, four two 
grave lots and four single graves were sold with 
perpetual care. One ten grave lot, two eight grave lots, 
one seven grave lot, one six grave lot, two 4 grave lots, 
one three grave lot and one two grave lot, were 
converted from annual care to perpetual care. Awarded 
by the American Legion for Veterans and their Families 
were six four grave lots, four two grave lots and one 
single grave with no revenue for care of these lots. 



Sixty two monument foundations were dug and laid. 
Twelve government markers were set for veterans. 
Sixteen sets of granite corner bounds for lots sold and 
awarded were set. Ninety monuments and one cript 
were damaged by vandals. The cost of repair and 
re-setting was $887.74. The flag pole in the veterans 
cemetery was vandalized, cost of repair $74.24. 

On our equipment replacement program, we 
purchased a 14 H.P. tractor with 36" rotary mower. 
Seven 20" push type rotary mowers were replaced. 



During the winter months the Cemetery four wheel 
drive kept the avenue's plowed. It also assisted the 
Public Works where needed in snow plowing. 



New lots in Veterans cemetery were laid out by 
Leon Turner and Walter Hulbert Jr. All surveying done 
by Mr. Turner, chairman of the Commissioners. 

The following is a list of receipts for services rendered 
by the Department for 1973: 

$5,210.00 

480.00 

630.00 

1 ,820.00 

986.10 

60.00 



Openings for interments 
Sectional liners 
Chapel Tent Rental 
New Lots & Graves 
Foundations & Bounds 
Annual care reported as collected 
Perpet. Care and Flower Fund income 
not known at time of report 



New Perpetual Care Deposits 

New Perpetual Flower Fund Deposits 



Total $9,186.10 



Total 



$5,200.00 

400.00 

$5,600.00 



Summer employees in the 
Cemetery Department help 
cut grass and trim. 

(Chronicle) 




40 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Frederic Winthrop, Jr., Chairman 

Your Conservation Commission met bimonthly in 
1973 in open sessions that were generally well attended 
and that covered a diverse number of subjects that 
ranged from recycling to fish ladders, from open space 
economics to dune restoration, from Bicentennial 
Planning to Polish Dancing, from P.C.D. to 30B. 

A high point in the year included the acquisition of 
another 12 acres of land adjoining the 70 acres 
purchased in '72. This is one more step in the 
Commission's objective to establish a greenbelt and to 
protect the water supply in Dow and Bull Reservoirs by 
curbing development in the watershed. Negotiations with 
neighboring landowners are ongoing. 

Thanks to the help of the Soil Conservation Service, 
the Forestry Dept., the High School, and numerous 
others, the Conservation Commission was able to carry 
out the planting of some 9,000 beach grass seedlings. 

The Second Annual Conservation Commission Polish 
Dance held at the "K Club" was again a smashing 
success. Enough money was raised to finish landscaping 
and seeding the Goodhue Canoe Landing on Peatfield 
Street. 

Responsibility for the State's "Dredge and Fill" laws, 
was transferred to the Conservation Commission in 
October of 1972. Holding hearings, issuing permits, and 
orders of condition has become a major job. 

1973 was not without its disappointments. First and 
foremost, our water supply remains critical. Town 



DOG OFFICER 



DOG OFFICER 

Irene Finnegan 

Below is the report from the beginning of my term, 
August 20, 1973. 

During this period there were: 

6 Dogs Injured and Destroyed 
31 Dogs Injured by Motorist 
29 Dogs Killed by Motorist 
Unclaimed strays put to Death 
13 Strays were found new owners 
31 Strays were returned to Owners 
263 Dog Complaints Checked Out 

From March 31, 1973 to January 10, 1974 the 
Town Clerk's Office had issued 835 dog licenses. 
Approximately 550 dogs are unlicensed in Ipswich. 

DOG OFFICER IRENE FINNEGAN 
Before Irene found good homes for these pups, they had a 
short stay at the new dog pound on Town Farm Road. 

(Ipswich Chronicle) 



action, we regret, appears to have been postponed in 
the expectation that the State will step in, even though 
our water consultants tell us that construction of state 
reservoir 30B will be too late. Last spring efforts to 
purchase a conservation restriction, which would have 
guaranteed that the Sturgis Farm remain forever open, 
fell just short of the 2/3 vote necessary for passage. 
Similarly, a clear, but insufficient, majority voted in 
vain to amend the zoning bylaws to include a section 
which would protect the town's wetlands. 

These last two dark clouds may well have silver 
linings. First, the relatively new concept of the 
conservation restriction received some welcome 
recognition in town as an equitable and inexpensive 
method to keep land open, and as a result, to keep 
down the financial burden of providing housing 
developments with town services. 

Second, due to the failure of last year's wetland bill, 
the Conservation Commission, in conjunction with the 
Planning Board, contracted with the Photogrammetric 
Division of the Raytheon Co. to delineate the Town's 
wetlands through aerial photography. The results are 
impressive and give rise to hopes that '74 will see the 
adoption of wetland zoning in Ipswich. 

For the moment, Ipswich remains uniquely endowed 
in natural resources. Bay, beach, saltmarsh, forest, and 
river all attest to this fact. She sits, however, perilously 
close to a population explosion, to a rush of 
suburbanization which could wipe out this precious 
legacy. A policy of careful planning and sensible land 
use is essential. We look forward to any help you can 
give us in achieving this goal. 




41 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Left to Right 


Term Expires 


Mr. Walter J. Pojasek 


1976 


Miss dinger MacKay-Smith 


Student Member 


Mrs. M. L. ScudJer 


1975 


Mrs. Patricia Manning 


1974 


Mr. Paul K. Gahm. Chairman 


1975 


Mr. Edwin H. Damon, Jr. 


1974 


Mr. James F. Collins 


1975 


Mr. Peter R. Greer 


1976 



(House of Hiniin) 








l^ - ^^ Z2 


^^^j» 










ENROLLMENT STATISTICS 






ENROLLMENT CHART BY GRADES 1968 1973 










GRADE 


1968 






1969 1970 


1971 




1972 




1973 


K 


206 






216 187 


164 




171 




165 


Nongraded Primary 








204 


276 










1 


200 






225 159 


97 




183 




197 


2 


190 






229 122 


141 




220 




198 


3 


193 






188 235 


185 




250 




208 


4 


211 






195 203 


239 




214 




242 


5 


204 






214 206 


210 




224 




219 


6 


198 






218 225 


213 




203 




232 


7 


219 






226 216 


228 




213 




202 


8 


180 






228 217 


215 




224 




214 


9 


185 






185 220 


213 




200 




177 


10 


189 






195 180 


218 




213 




171 


11 


198 






183 197 


177 




210 




174 


12 


133 






185 174 


198 




177 




180 


PC. 


2 






1 2 


1 




1 




1 


Sp. Ed. 


23 






27 27 


27 




25 




4 


TOTALS 


2531 




ENR 


2715 2774 


2802 




2728 




2584 




OLLMENT CHART - OCTOBER 


1, 1973 




















Sp. 




GRADE 


K 


1 


2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 


9 10 


11 


12 P.G. 


Ed. 


TOTAL 


Doyon 


69 


64 


84 


87 89 85 78 








4 


560 


Burley 


41 


47 


52 


42 










182 


Shatswell 


21 


61 


42 


55 










179 


Boone Hall 


34 


25 


2C 


1 24 










103 


Baptist 








48 










48 


Winthrop 








105 134 154 










393 


Junior High 








202 214 










416 


Senior High 










177 171 


174 


180 1 




703 


TOTAL 


165 : 


197 


198 


; 208 242 219 232 202 214 


177 171 


174 


180 1 


4 


2584 




EMPLOYMENT CERTIFICATES 














ISSUED TO MINORS - 1973 




















Age Age 




















14-16 16-18 


Total 
















Boys 


13 50 


63 
















Girls 


14 60 


74 











42 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 




(House of Hinlin) 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

John H. Stella 

On October 1, 1973 the total school enrollment was 
2584, a decrease of 143 as compared to October 1, 
1972. 

Whittier Regional School became operational in 
September, 1973 and 110 Ipswich students transferred 
to that school. Whittier accommodates Grades 9-12 
students and operates a post-secondary two year 
program. 

During the past year, due to decreasing enrollments 
the teaching staff was reduced by six. However, several 
new professional staff members were added to 
strengthen various curriculum areas. They are as follows: 
1 Full-time Physical Education Teacher for the Ralph C. 

Whipple Memorial School 
1 Full-time Instrumental Music Teacher for the Ralph C. 

Whipple Memorial School 
1 Full-time Vocal Music Teacher for the High School 
1 Part-time Instrumental Teacher for the Elementary 

Schools 
1 2 days-per-week Teacher for the Physically 

Handicapped children (50% reimbursable) 
1 additional Aide has been authorized for the 

Burley-Boone Hall Schools. 



The School Committee in view of the loss of 
students to the Whittier School and a slight reduction in 
the elementary enrollments authorized the reduction of 
six teachers. They also authorized a reduction of two 
cafeteria workers. This was carried out by the 
Administration. 

The 18 month budget beginning January 1, 1973, 
and ending June 30, 1974, was a monumental 
undertaking both for the School Committee and the 
Administration. The Finance Committee liaison member 
was present at many of the budget sessions and 
numerous conferences were held by the Superintendent 
of Schools and the Chairman of the Finance Committee. 



At town meeting time, however, the Finance 
Committee recommended a reduction of the school 
budget by $84,000.00. The Town Meeting upheld this 
recommendation and a Petition in Equity was brought 
before the Essex Superior Court by 19 taxpayers. 



After lengthy litigation, Judge Paul Sullivan, Associate 
Justice of the Superior Court, ruled in the Petitioners' 
favor and $56,478.81 was restored to the School 
Budget. In addition, the judge ruled that $14,119.70 be 
added to the $56,478.81 resulting in a total of 
$70,598.51 which was restored to the school budget. 

As a result of the opinion the fiscal autonomy of the 
School Committee was upheld in accordance with 
Chapter 71, Section 34 of the General Laws. 

The school department is still renting the basement 
of the Baptist Church to educate 48 elementary children 
for which we pay $4,000.00 rent. The church 
authorities have proposed an increase in this rent for 
the 1974-75 school year. We are also renting Boone Hall 
to educate over 100 children. The rent is $7,000.00 per 
year and the church authorities are requesting the fee to 
be $9,000.00 for the 1974-75 year. 

The School Building Needs Committee has been 
reactivated. Some new members have been added and 
meetings have been held regularly in an attempt to solve 
the school housing problem. 

The School Committee voted unanimously to move 
in the direction of providing a new elementary school 
and this consensus is guiding the School Building Needs 
Committee in its deliberations. 

I extend to the School Committee my sincere 
appreciation for their dedication and interest and many 
hours spent in providing the best possible education for 
our students. 



I extend to all school personnel my sincere 
appreciation for their excellent cooperation and finally I 
extend deep appreciation to all the town agencies for 
their excellent cooperation with the schools. 



43 



HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 



HIGH SCHOOL 



Joseph Rogers, Principal 

Enrollment as of October 1, 1973 
Enrollment as of June, 1973 



Wk 1 




f f 

- 


t 



The opening of Whittier Vocational Technical School 
somewhat eliminated the over crowding condition at the 
high school. However, loss of pupils to Whittier did not 
have the impact we had anticipated since many 
returned. Nevertheless we did eliminate the extended 
day and the full Open Campus Program. 

For all intents and purposes our Open Campus 
Program is defunct, mostly due to not having an 
advisor. While we received much criticism of the 
program it served, and should still be serving, a very 
important function in our total school curriculum. 

Our staff has been reduced as our pupil population is 
reduced. However, there is still a great need for growth 
and improvement in the area of Fine Arts. This can 
only be done by the addition of a new facility - 
hopefully an addition to the school to accommodate 
Music, Art, Drama, and Theatre Arts. Our existing 
makeshift operation has merely whetted the appetites of 
our pupils to explore the Arts. 



Buildings 

Two rooms were divided to provide necessary space 
for teaching pupils with specific learning disabilities. As 
the state moves toward mandating that all pupils age 3 
through 21 be educated our space problem will once 
more be very acute. One of the divided rooms has 
provided space to accommodate a mathematics 
laboratory. This houses calculators and various 
supplementary math materials, and is manned every 
period by a math teacher who provides instruction, 
extra help, and direction in proper use of the 
equipment. 

The building continues to receive full use both day, 
night, and weekends. Our Adult Education Program has 
grown and is caring for the needs of our adult 
community. 

In June of 1973 Miss Helen Brown retired after 32 
years of exemplary service to the youth of Ipswich. 
Ipswich owes a debt of gratitude to Miss Brown for her 
unselfish dedication to our children. 



Conclusions 

1. The elimination of the extended day has brought 
our pupils and faculty into a more cohesive unit, and 
we are now functioning as such. It is a pleasure to 
administer a school under these conditions - however, 
overcrowding is still with us. 

2. Certain additions to our physical plant must be 
built to accommodate the need and growth in Art, 
Music, Drama-Theatre Arts, plus Physical Education and 
Athletics. 

3. Additional land adjacent to the school should be 
purchased to prepare for the eventual expansion of our 
school. 

4. Whittier Voke Tech should serve a real purpose in 
caring for the vocational needs of our students and 
I.H.S. should become a more comprehensive high school. 



701 
768 




44 



WHIPPLE MEMORIAL JR. HIGH 




R. C. WHIPPLE MEMORIAL JR. HIGH SCHOOL 

John Huttenan, Principal 

Enrollment 

The enrollment figures for 1973-74 as of October 1, 
1973 are as follows: 



Grade 7 
Grade 8 
Total 



202 
214 
416 



Extra Personnel 



Beginning in September of this school year an 
additional staff member was added to our music 
department to handle instrumental music. For the first 
time in a number of years a full time band instructor is 
being provided at our school. A band has once again 
been organized and students are in addition given 
individual instrumental lessons. We have been pleased 



that this void has been filled and that the students have 
been making excellent progress. 

In addition, our two part time physical education 
instructors were assigned on a full time basis at the 
junior high level. Also, this has enabled us to expand 
our physical education program to include health, safety 
and first aid instruction. 

Foreign Language — The introduction of Spanish to 
the program in 1972 has proven to be successful. Again, 
another change was made this year so that we expanded 
our language instruction to four times a week vs. three 
times a week as it was in the past. 

Science — The ISCS science program has been 
expanded to the eighth grade this year. This lab 
orientated program has been well received by the 
teachers and students. Parents are invited to visit the 
classrooms to observe this individualized approach to the 
teaching of science. 

Theater Production — I would like to commend the 
students and faculty members who have been involved 
in our annual musical presentations. Last spring the 
students performed "Sound of Music". This spring plans 
are being made to present "Music Man". Even though 
the cast and advisors work under less than - satisfactory 
conditions their presentations have become one of the 
highlights of our school year. Hopefully, in the future, 
better facilities will be made available for dramatic 
presentations in our community. 

Evaluation — In January 1974 a visiting team of 
twenty educators will conduct an intensive three day 
evaluation of our school. We are one of the few junior 
high schools in the area to avail themselves of the 
evaluation services provided by the New England 
Association of Schools and Colleges. A complete written 
evaluation of our strengths and weaknesses will be made 
available to the staff, administration, and community in 
the spring of 1974. 



DOYON MEMORIAL SCHOOL 



PAUL F. DOYON MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

William E. Waitt, Jr., Principal 

In 1973, our eighth year as a school, provided many 
opportunities for challenge. Growing student population, 
changing staff, spiraling costs, sickness, increasing special 
needs demands, and growing public use of our facilities, 
combine with exciting educational changes involving 
curriculum and the development of individualized 
instruction, to make each day an invigorating experience 
for both administration and staff. 

Organization 

The school continues to operate as a seven year 
(K-6) elementary school, with three sections of each 
grade, and with three rooms devoted to serving children 




45 



with special needs. Enrollment from January to June 
averaged 542 students. 

In September we began with a record enrollment of 
562 students. As the year ends, we continue to support 
the largest student to teacher classes in the system. 

Teaching Personnel 

Doyon School has a staff of 36 full and part time 
professionals, which include 18 tenure teachers, 4 tenure 
candidates, 6 second year teachers and eight first year 
teachers. Average experience is 7 1/3 years. 



General 

Work continued in developing an individualized 
program in reading, math and science. We continued to 
supplement the staff with student teachers from Gordon 
College, Salem State College and with parent volunteers. 



Parents are more involved in our schools with a large 
number serving as volunteers in our library and in many 
primary classrooms. Our Parent Advisory Committee 
continues to be a positive group, giving advice on our 
progress and aid in determining our direction. 



WINTHROP AND BAPTIST SCHOOLS 




WINTHROP AND BAPTIST SCHOOLS 
Samuel B. Levy, Principal 

Organization 

The Winthrop-Baptist Schools house four classes of 
grade four, five of grade five and six classes of grade six 
at Winthrop and two classes of grade four at the Baptist 
School. At the end of the year the Winthrop had 396 
students and Baptist 48 students. The Winthrop resource 
center serves both of the schools and includes a library 
with reference works, general reading material and film, 
audio and visual material available for individual and 
group research work. The center is manned by a shared 
librarian and a corps of dedicated volunteer workers. 

The school day is 6 hours and 15 minutes. Class "A" 
lunches are served. Bus transportation is provided for 
222 students or 50% of the student body. 

Many civic, church and private groups avail 
themselves of the opportunity to use our facilities and 
equipment after school, evenings and week-ends. 
Included in these groups are Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, 
Coast Guard Auxiliary, Square Dance Clubs, Greek 
School classes, Conservation Groups and fund-raising car 
wash activities. 



Curriculum 

The schools provide a standard elementary school 
curriculum with a flexible structure. Innovative and 
imaginative approaches to the curriculum are employed 
to enliven students' interest in their education. 
Specialists operate in the areas of art, music and 
physical education. Instrumental music lessons are 
provided for 175 students. An active chorus meets 
weekly. Provisions are made for students in the area of 
specific learning disabilities and speech therapy. A Title 
I Project provides three trained teacher aides to work in 
the area of learning disabilities and one in the area of 
mathematics. 



Teaching Personnel 

In addition to the classroom teachers, the staff 
includes vocal music, instrumental and art specialists, a 
full time physical education teacher, a full time specific 
learning disabilities specialist, full time guidance 
counselor, a part-time guidance specialist and a 
consulting psychologist. 

Many staff members are active in post graduate work. 
The entire staff is involved in scheduled workshops in 
the areas of curriculum development and the various 
disciplines. 

A nurse, a secretary, two full-time custodians, two 
lunchroom aides and three cafeteria workers complete 
the Winthrop School staff plus a lunchroom aide and 
custodian shared with other schools service the Baptist 
School. 




46 



BURLEY, SHATSWELL AND BOONE HALL SCHOOL 



BURLEY, SHATSWELL AND BOONE HALL SCHOOLS 

Marcia J. Fowler, Principal 

Burley, Shatswell and Boone Hall Schools serve a 
total of 464 primary students. Together they are staffed by 
twenty classroom teachers and thirteen teaching specialists. 
The specialists provide direct instruction and services to 
students as well as assistance to classroom teachers in 
planning daily group and individual activities. 

Our primary school philosophy emphasizes the 
uniqueness of the individual and continuous progress. Each 
child is encouraged to develop as fully as possible his own 
particular gifts and to apply his special skills in ways which 
best serve any group of which he is a part. Likewise his 
particular academic, social, physical, and emotional needs 
are constantly re-evaluated and prescribed for by the staff 
so that all of his school experiences may focus on helping 
him grow as a productive, skillful, and confident individual. 
This focus has necessarily led to a high degree of 
individualization and personalization in instruction. 
Learning tasks are designed to match the learning rate and 
style of individual children. 

The results of our team effort to establish meaningful 
placement for each child within realistic and harmonious 
classroom groups have been especially effective. Parents, 
teachers, specialists, guidance counselors and the principal 
were all a part of this placement process. The strengths and 
needs of each child, together with the dynamics of the total 



classroom group were carefully considered. 

Because we also recognize teachers as unique individuals 
who function most effectively in the type of classroom 
organization which capitalizes upon their particular 
strengths, classroom structure and style throughout the 
three schools is varied. Boone Hall is comprised of a 
morning and afternoon kindergarten class and one class 
each of grades one, two and three. Shatswell School has one 
kindergarten class, one first grade, two first/second and 
four second/third grade combination classes. Burley School 
has two kindergarten classes, two first, two second, and two 
third grade classes plus one second/third grade 
combination. 

An exceptionally low teacher turnover this year has 
enhanced continuity. While new programs are constantly 
being evaluated, the primary goal this year is in refining, 
personalizing, and "localizing" the many exciting and 
progressive curriculum designs which have been introduced 
during the past two or three years. 

We have encouraged parent involvement in a tutorial 
role, in sharing specialized knowledge of hobbies or 
occupations with classroom groups, and in Parent Advisory 
Council discussions and programs. The response is 
encouraging, an example being the hard-working volunteer 
crews who assisted the Recreation Department in installing 
playground equipment at the Burley and Shatswell Schools. 



DIRECTOR OF CURRICULUM 



DIRECTOR OF CURRICULUM 
Lyn Hatrwick 



The major thrust in the area of curriculum has been 
toward the coordination of activities in all disciplines, 
the improvement of lines of communication and on 
continuous evaluation of materials most appropriate for 
effective learning for our students from Kindergarten to 
grade twelve. 



Effort has also been extended in order to involve the 
community in establishing goals and curricular strategies. 
Exploration in the area of career education resulted in a 
careful needs assessment and the development of a ninth 
grade pilot program about careers. These were the 
results of the combined effort of teachers, 
administrators, students, and local community 
representatives. The committee is working toward a total 
K-12 program geared to meet the needs of our student 
body and consistent with our rapidly changing society. 

Another example of such effort is in the area of the arts. 
The art and music teachers have been meeting on a regular 
basis in order to provide for a carefully articulated K-12 



arts curriculum. A local committee entitled Friends of the 
Arts is working with the teachers in order to take advantage 
of local talent and to assist in the program development as 
well. 

The formulation of individual school parent advisory 
committees and the Title I parent advisory committee is 
providing an open forum for communication and the 
exchange of information about our school program and 
school and community educational needs. 

Summer workshops and on-going in-service activities 
have involved our teachers in establishing a K-12 language 
arts philosophy and guidelines, in the development of a K-8 
guide including specific performance objectives and a 
cumulative record card that will facilitate the 
individualization of instruction, a complete individualized 
science program (ISCS) at the seventh and eighth grade 
levels, two new humanities programs at the high school 
level, and a new design for a business education program 
which will be operational in 1974-1975. A reading course 
taught by our own reading specialists provided 
opportunities for our subject matter specialists and general 
classroom teachers to consider those reading skills necessary 
for instruction in all disciplinary areas. 



47 



Curriculum development is a never-ending task as new 
techniques and strategies for learning are identified. 
Concomitant with the need to examine and assess these 
new ideas are newly emerging educational needs which 
become apparent as our society continues to be evermore 
complex. The same kind of careful evaluation and 
cooperative endeavor as we have had in Ipswich during this 
past year will continue to provide us with a base for the 
most meaningful learning experiences for our students. 



As I am completing my first year in Ipswich, I wish to 
take this opportunity to personally thank Mr. Stella, our 
school superintendent, our teachers and administrators, our 
students, the members of our school committee and the 
community of Ipswich as each has provided support and 
assistance in assessing our needs and in developing 
appropriate goals for improved instruction. 



PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 




up-coming budget deliberations will show, we fall short 
in certain areas. While all needed programs are to some 
degree in existance, the delivery of services to all 
students and children needing them is, in several 
instances, inadequate. Our objective in the coming year 
will be to extend special needs programs to all levels of 
the school system, in this way making services available 
to all school-age children with special needs. 



Pre-school programs, and programs for students 
beyond school age, will be delayed until the needy 
population in each category is identified. 



PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 
Joseph J. Battaglio, Director 

The emergence of new legislation pertaining to the 
education of children with special needs necessitated a 
re-assessment of present programs and needs. The new 
law, Chapter 766, fixes responsibility for meeting the 
special needs of children at the school district level. 
School committees must develop a mechanism for 
identifying, screening and evaluating children who, 
because of temporary or more permanent adjustment 
difficulties, are unable to progress effectively in a 
regular education program and require special education. 
The age range covered runs from pre-school (age 3) to 
post-school (age 21). 

School committees must make available a full range 
of program types to implement education plans for 
children evaluated, as prescirbed by the evaluation team. 

The implications of this legislation for cities and 
towns is enormous. It constitutes a re-direction of 
educational resources from the needs of the so-called 
normal school population to a more equitable 
distribution of resources for all children. It necessitates 
large fiscal appropriations for staff and programs by 
each school district, much of which will return later in 
the form of re-imbursements; and it calls for space to 
house programs and personnel. 

In Ipswich, our assessment revealed both strengths 
and deficiencies. It is to our credit that because of a 
traditional sensitivity to the needs of all children, 
Ipswich has a long head start in meeting the 
requirements of the new law. Nevertheless, as the 




48 



HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES 



Jo Ann Amatucci 

* Sandra Young Benedetto 

* Therese Ann Bolduc 

* Sarah Frances Bourque 
Elizabeth Marie Brown 

f* Hollie Jean Bucklin 
Michele Adair Burridge 
Teresa Diane Calabro 
Pamela Diane Campbell 
Sarah Gail Capers 
Patricia Jean Conley 

f* Robin Ann De Angelis 
Lee Ann Taylor Cook 
Patricia Louise Desmond 
Cathryn Joanne Dodge 
Vanessa Eileen Douglas 

f* Laura Ellen Fidrocki 

* Susan Mary Ford 
Amy Brooks Frost 
Linda Marie Gallant 
Dawn Elizabeth Geanakakis 
Nancy Ann Gray 

* Eileen Heigh 

* Patricia Ann Hein 
Joanne Vivian Hetnar 
Peggy Louise Howarth 
Jennifer Marie Johnson 

* Pamela Eve Johnstone 
Iris Kapsalis 

f* Lorry Sue Klosowski 
Carlene P. La Foe 
Ellin B. Logan 
Margaret MacMillan 
Andrea MacWhinnie Mercier 

* Maureen Carol Maney 
Jan Therese Marcaurelle 

* Cheryl Ann Martel 
Denyse Rose Masse 
Lauren Lockhart McLoon 

t* Dieuwke Anne Messelaar 
Sheila A. Mitchell 

* Robin Taylor Morang 
+ Robin Adria Morgan 

Theresa Marie Moscarillo 

f* Debra Ann Mulley 
Carol Nylen 
Ann Norma CNeil 

f* Katherine D. Parker 
Marie Claire Prisby 
Maura Patricia Quinn 
Linda Marie Ragosta 
Debra Ann Rauscher 
Paula Jeanne Riddle 
Lynda Renee Rieman 
Nancy Anita Shaw 

f* Linda Marie Siemasko 
Virginia C. Slysz 



Janet Smith 

* Sharra Elizabeth Chevalier Smith 
Elizabeth Diane Allen Snow 
Betty Jean Sotioropoulos 

* Paula Sue Speakman 
Sandra Jean Stamatakos 
Rebecca Ellen Thatcher 
Martha Jean Thibault 
Ann Elizabeth Thimmer 
Jean Ann Thurber 
Gudrun Trestl 

* Paula Jean Van Horn 
f* Phyllis Jayne Viladenis 

Susan Marie Vincent 
Susan Elizabeth Waitt 

* Anne Marie Wallace 
Katherine Elizabeth Wallace 
Katherine Ellen Wanzer 
Rebecca R. Whitcomb 

* Kimberly White 
t* Wendy Ann White 

Deborah Ann Wile 
Deborah L. Wynaught 
Andrew William Alexson, Jr. 
Paul E. Amundsen 
John James Arvanites 

* Jon Clark Atherton 
Stephen John Barton 
John Emery Bartlett, Jr. 
Brian L. Benjamin 
Dean C. Black 

* Scott Perkins Bouranis 
David Allen Bowen 
Bruce Dana Brigham 

+ John Joseph Bruni 

Mark Stanley Butterfield 
Chester George Brockelbank III 
Scott William Camacho 
Paul Robert Castori 
Darryl Vincent Chiappini 

* Robert E. Clark, Jr. 

* Daniel E. Clasby 

* David James Anthony Clemeno 
Philip Andrew Colbert 

Billy R. Coleman 
Mark William Collyer 
Michael Edward Co mo 
William John Co mo 
Freeman I. Corkum, Jr. 
Steven Wayne Crawford 

* Roger H. Day 

Michael Anthony DeAmario 
Timothy William Demakis 
Matthew Thomas Desmond 
Richard Kenneth Dorr, Jr. 
Daniel Droukis 
Michael Joseph Dudzisz 
Robert Michael Duff 



Frank R. Equi, Jr. 
Jeffrey C. Fowler 
Roger Dean Fowler 
Glenn Allen Foster 
Joseph Walter Gajewski 

* Theodore Louis Galanis 
Michael James Gallop 

* Benjamin Mark Gorniewicz 
Norman William Graham, Jr. 
Donald James Greene 
Richard H. Gwinn, Jr. 
Emilio Patricio Abad Herrera 
Edward P. Hetnar, Jr. 
Daniel Edward Hickling 
Bruce A. Jacobson 

f* Eric David Jewett 

* Ronald Philip Jodz 
Keith Michael Jones 
Richard H. Jordan 
Donald Michael Kent 
Lee Edward Kirkland 
Paul Henry Kirwin, Jr. 

* Richard J. Kline 
David Michael Kmiec 
Bruce Gerard Kotek 
David B. Ladd 
Gerard J. Landry 

* John Roger La Plante 
Daniel Edward Laterowicz 
Vincent A. Lopes 

* Wayne Anthony Mackey 
Thomas John Marr 

+ Peter James Martel 

Robert Colin Martel 

William Jason Martel 

John Walter Mroszczyk 

Robert F. Mullen 

Richard Michael Murawski 

Joel F. Ogren 
+ Jonathan Olech 

* Donald Allan Paquin 
Jonathan S. Perley 
Bradley M. Poirier 
Paul Edward Radzinski 

t* Stephen Barrett Robie 

* David R. Savage, Jr. 
Frank Hamilton Shaw 
Warren Alan Smith 
Nathan Thomas Szaryc 
Albert Anthony Ventresca, Jr. 
Timothy H. Walsh 

Jeffrey Alan Weagle 
Paul Frank Wegzyn 
Peter Joseph Wegzyn 
Michael J. Wysocki 
Gary C. Zabelski 
Richard Alan Ziemlak 



* Honors 

f Member of National Honor Society 

+ In absentia 



49 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



POLICE EMERGENCY 356-4343 

FIRE EMERGENCY 356-4321 



Be sure to give your name and address as well as the nature of your emergency clearly. Do not hang up until you are 
sure that your message has been understood. 

FOR ANSWERS ON: CALL THE TELEPHONE 

Assessments Office of the Assessor 356-4010 

Payment of Taxes Treasurer and Collector 356-3100 

Payment of Water and Light Bills Electric Light Dept 356-4331 

Billing, Water and Light Billing Office 356-4830 

Birth, Death, Marriage Certificates Town Clerk's Office 356-4161 

Building Building Inspector 356-5333 

Cemeteries Cemetery Superintendent 356-3933 

Civil Defense Jr. High School 356-4342 

Dog, Hunting, Fishing Licenses Town Clerk's Office 356-4161 

Education Information School Superintendent 356-2935 

Elections, Voting, Registration Town Clerk's Office 356-4161 

Electric Electric Light Dept 356-4331 

Engineering Public Works Dept 356-5591 

Fire, Routine Fire Department 356-4322 

Health, Sanitation, Rubbish, Garbage Board of Health 356-4900 

Highway and Streets Public Works Dept 356-5591 

Library Librarian 356-4646 

Licensing Authority Board of Selectmen 356-2262 

Oil Burner Permits Fire Chief 356-4322 

Permits for Burning Fire Department 356-4322 

Permits for Large Quantity Dumping Board of Health 356-4900 

Recreation Recreation and Parks 356-3767 

Schools Burley School 356-2666 

High School 356-3137 

Junior High School 356-3535 

Doyon School 356-5506 

Shatswell School 356-2312 

Winthrop School 356-2976 

Nurse 356-5507 

356-3535 

Sewer Public Works Dept 356-5591 

Veteran's Services Veteran's Agent 356-39 15 

Water Problems Public Works Dept 356-5591 

Youth Drop In Center 356-03 12 

MEETINGS DAY & TIME PLACE 

Annual Town Meeting 1st Mon. in March High School 

Annual Town Election 2nd Mon. in March Precinct Polling Place 

Conservation Commission 1st & 3rd Thurs. of ea. mo. Town Hall 

Finance Committee Last Wed. of ea. mo. Payne School 

Board of Health 2nd Tues. of ea. mo. Town Hall 

Library Trustees 3rd Mon. of ea. mo. Library 

Planning Board Every other Tues. Town Hall 

Recreation & Parks Com. 2nd Wed. of ea. mo. Memorial Bldg. 

School Committee 1st & 3rd Thurs. of ea. mo. To Be Announced 

Selectmen Every Monday Court Room 

Historical Commission 2nd & 4th Wed. of ea. mo. Town Hall 

Cemetery Commission 1st Fri. of ea. mo. Cemetery Office 

Housing Authority 2nd Tues. of ea. mo. Community Bldg. Caroline Ave. 

Shellfish Advisory Com. 3rd Wed. of ea. mo. Town Hall 

Youth Commission 2nd & 4th Tues. of ea. mo. Town Hall 

50 



IPSWICH AT A GLANCE 



Government: 
Location: 

Area: 

Geographical 

Center: 

Population: 

Transportation: 

Tax Rate: 
Total Value: 

Fire Dept.: 

Police Dept: 

Water: 

Sewer: 

Electricity: 

Gas: 

Recreational 

Facilities: 



Zoning: 

Housing: 
Schools: 



Churches: 

Medical 
Facilities: 

Shopping: 



Public Library: 
Health: 

News: 
Industry: 



Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts in Essex County 
Founded 1633 — Incorporated 1634 
Ipswich is in the 6th Congressional District 

Our Representative is Michael J. Harrington (D) 
Ipswich is in the 3rd Senatorial District 

Our Senator is William L. Saltonstall (R) 
Ipswich is in the 2nd Essex District 

Our Representative in General Court is David J. Lane (R) 
The Annual Town Meeting is on the first Monday in March at the High School 
The Annual Elections are on the second Monday in March at each Precinct Place 

Selectmen-Town Manager Charter - New England Town Meeting 

Centrally Located on Massachusetts' North Shore — 35 Miles N.E. of Boston - Driving Time 45 

minutes. 

33.35 square miles — 21,344 acres 

Pedrick House, corner of Jeffrey's Neck Road and Ocean Drive 

(1971) 11,188 

Boston & Maine R.R. - Frequent Rail service - Train time to Boston 50 Min. - U.S. Route 1, 

U. S. Route 1A - Harbor Facilities - Taxi Service 

$55.00 - All homes are assessed at approximately 70% of fair market Value 

1973 Real Estate $67,789,006 - Personal Property $1,635,893 (Total $69,424,899) 

Number of Accounts - Approximately 4,600 

Full-time 18 man force - 27 call man force - equipment including one new 100' Aerial 

ladder truck 

Full-time 18 man force - 20 man auxiliary force - 3 radio equipped cruisers - 1 inspector 

To most of Town 

To part of Town 

Municipal Plant to whole Town. 

To 75% of Town 

Supervised Playgrounds - Summer Swimming Instructions - Tennis Courts - Softball Diamonds - 

Baseball Diamonds - Public Beaches on Seashore - Ponds for Ice Skating (some are lighted) - 9 

hole Golf Course - Boat Club - Yacht Club - Wildlife Sanctuary - Salt & Fresh Water Fishing - 

Movie Theatre - 16 Lane Bowling Alley - Pool & Billiards - Golden Age Club - Teen Drop In 

Center. 

Protection by adequate zoning and planning regulations insures controlled growth of residential, 

commercial and industrial areas. 

3 Projects (144 units providing for low income families and Elderly Citizens) 

4 Elementary Schools (2 Auxiliary Buildings) - Jr. High School - High School - Pupil/Teacher 
Ratio 19.57-1 - Special Classes for Retarded or emotionally disturbed educable - Classes for 
Perceptually handicapped - Kindergartens - Comprehensive program of evening classes for adults. 
2 Baptist - 3 Catholic - 1 Christian Science - 1 Congregational - 1 Episcopal - 1 Greek Orthodox - 
1 Methodist 

12 Physicians - 6 Dentists. - 45 Bed Hospital - Visiting Nurses - Convalescent Homes - Ambulance 

Service - 2 Pharmacies - (1 Veterinarian) 

Good Facilities in Center of Town - New shopping center - Antique Shops - Apparel Stores - Auto 

Body & Supply Shops - Banks - Beauty Shops (Barber shops & Hair Stylists) - Building Supplies - 

Cleaners - Gift Shops - Grocery Stores (fruit & vegetable stands) - Hardware Stores - Jewelers - 

Laundromats - Pharmacies - Restaurants - Service Stations - Sport Shops - Variety Stores and 

many more. 

53,500 volume library - open 6 days a week - Micro filmed data - Audio/Visual Equipment 

Dump open 7 days a week - Rubbish Collection Weekly - Garbage Collection Weekly in winter 

twice in summer - Ambulance Service 

Two Weekly Newspapers - Represented in three daily papers - Represented by 2 radio stations 

Sylvania - Five Major Shellfish Plants - Monument Manufacturing - Wholesale Fruit Business - 

Several Wood-working establishments. 

51 



■ 
H13 



IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 



III 



3 2122 00162 126 1 



IN MEMORIAM 




Elizabeth Cole 

Selectwoman 

October 04, 1973 




Roland Foucher 

Health Agent 

April 02, 1973 




Roland Bowen 

Recreation - Parks 

February, 1972 




John Vincent Hubbard 

Selectmen 

February 02, 1973 




Armand Brouillette 
School Department 
February 07, 1973 




Samuel Lavoie 

Water Department 

June 23, 1973 




Richard W. Davis 

Finance Committee 

July 21, 1973 




James D. Reilly 

Treasurer 
August 08, 1973 




Vincent Boy Ian 

Treasurer 

November 01, 1973 




MR IPSWICH 



'Pswfch Public Library 

losw| c*i, Massachusetts 





4 f1 



We Give Our Thanks